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Whole Hog Butchering Class

We’re excited to partner with The Co-op Food Stores to bring you a delicious evening of pork, beer, and cooking—a tasty trifecta!

Trim the fat from your diet—literally!—with a hog butchering demonstration from professional butcher Jeff Withington on September 29 at the Co-op’s Culinary Learning Center in Lebanon.

Observe and learn about pig butchering while sampling various yummy dishes highlighting the different parts of the pig. Find out why a pork butt is really from the shoulder and the leg is called the ham. You’ll also get a chance to sample a local cider and two local beers, too!

Tickets are limited and cost $20. Call the Co-op service desk at 603.643.2667 to reserve your tickets for this tasty event before they sell out!

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Slow Cooker Pork Ribs

This recipe is courtesy of The Beeroness. Cook up some Stout & Sriracha Barbecue Sauce to go with these for your next dinner.

Ingredients

2 lbs country-style pork ribs
1/4 c tomato paste
3 Tbsp soy sauce
3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp garlic powder
1/3 c brown sugar, packed
12 ounces beer (high ABV dark beer like porter works best)

Slow-Cooked Ribs - BF

Instruction

  1. In a small bowl whisk together everything except the beer.
  2. Add the ribs to the rub and coat. Put the ribs and sauce into a slow cooker and add the beer.
  3. Cook on low for 6-6 hours or until the starts to lightly fall off the bone.
  4. Serve with your favorite barbecue sauce or try Stout & Sriracha Beer barbecue Sauce.
Finished Dish2

Braised Pork + Cabbage: A One-Pot Late Winter Farmers Market Meal

Braised Pork & Cabbage: A One-Pot Late Winter Farmers Market Meal 

Hi, I’m Bethany, from the Vital Communities Transportation Program. I love food and have sweated, laughed, cried, and hustled til my feet ached in restaurant kitchens and bakeries, so Valley Food & Farm recruited me to write some recipes this spring. I’m thrilled!

My posts will share my passions for building everyone’s basic cooking skills, wasting as little as possible, eating healthy, and of course, eating in season. Here we go.

Magazines and radio shows are already gushing about springy greens recipes, but if you’re eating seasonally in the Upper Valley, winter food is still on the table. And with this week’s cutting wind, that’s fine with me.

You can get the main ingredients for this one-pot dish at the winter farmers market. Get a bag of local spinach and make a salad to go alongside your braise if you’re feeling springy.

Your farmers market shopping list:

– Pack of four bone-in pork chops (bones make things tasty, keep us healthy, and you can save them for stock)
– A large yellow onion
– Bulb of garlic
– 4 carrots
– 1 small cabbage (any kind – green, red, Napa, Savoy)
– 4 medium-sized potatoes
– Cider vinegar

For the photos here (and supper with friends), I used loin chops from pigs raised by family friends who make cheese. (Cheese-making = leftover whey = pig food.)

This dish uses classic ingredients from northern and eastern Europe – pork, carrots, potatoes, cabbage, and caraway seeds (these are the seeds in rye bread). My Danish great-grandmother’s version uses sauerkraut and prunes instead of cabbage, carrots, and caraway. Her recipe is tasty, but a little intense and only makes sense if you have extra sauerkraut sitting around. The version I’m sharing here uses fresh cabbage instead. Play around with different root vegetables and spices or try it with sauerkraut if you want.

Braised Pork & Cabbage

Adapted from Martha Stewart.com
Prep time: 20 mins          Total time: 1 hour           Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (or chicken fat, lard, etc.)
  • 4 bone-in rib pork chops, 8 ounces each
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • ½ medium cabbage or one small cabbage (4 cups total, cored and chopped)
  • 4 medium carrots, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4-5 medium potatoes (about a 1 lb.), sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • 3/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 T Dijon or whole-grain mustard
  • 1 ¼ cup water, stock, or wine from an open bottle that needs to be used up
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1 t caraway seeds, optional
  • 1 bay leaf, optional
  • 1 t dried thyme, optional
  • Chopped parsley, optional (Try to use at least ONE of these herbs – ideally all.)

Don’t panic about this long list ingredients. You probably have almost all of them just gathering dust somewhere in the cupboard, right? No need to go buy any of them if you don’t have them.

Directions

  1. Prep the vegetables:

– Quarter the cabbage. Slice away the core/stem area.Chopped Cabbage (1) Slice thinly across the grain.
– I peeled the carrots because the skins looked a little weird – but I saved the skins for stock!
– Chop the onions and mince the garlic.
– Slice the potatoes.

Chopped Vegetables (1)

  1. In a Dutch oven (5-quart pot with a tight-fitting lid), heat 1 tablespoon oil over Browned Chops (1)medium-high. Generously sprinkle pork with salt. Cook until well browned, about 3-4 minutes per side. Remove pork.
  2. Add remaining tablespoon oil, onion, cabbage, carrot, garlic, bay leaf, and thyme; season with salt. Don’t worry about the brown pork bits stuck to the pot. They’ll release with the moisture of the vegetables and add to the flavor. Cook, stirring Browning Vegetables (1)frequently, until vegetables have browned somewhat, about 8 minutes.
  3. Add vinegar, caraway seeds, mustard, and 1 1/4 cups water/stock/wine; bring to a boil. Add potatoes, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cover, and cook until cabbage and potatoes are almost tender, about 15-20 minutes.
  4. Return pork to pot; cover, and continue cooking until pork is just cooked through and potatoes are tender, 10 to 15 minutes more.
  5. Grind a generous amount of black pepper over braise, sprinkle with chopped parsley (if using) and serve.

This is tasty as leftovers.

If you’re inclined to be thrifty and nutritionally wise like a grandmother, save the gnawed-on bones for a stock – simmer the bones (plus any others you may have in the freezer) in 2-3 quarts of water for a few hours, adding more water if needed. In the last 30 minutes of cooking, add carrot peelings (from above), and any onion and celery scraps you have. Or add a small chopped onion, chopped stalk of celery, and a chopped carrot. Strain, cool, skim the fat, and use the broth in split pea soup, ramen, etc. (This morning I made my stock into a soup with local shiitake mushrooms, onion, ginger, spinach, and other veggies.)

braising

Oven Braising 101

September always bring a pang of nostalgia for our brief and beautiful summers in Vermont, but with the cooler nights, my mind turns towards the comforting cold weather meals of autumn – steaming stews, baked casseroles and roasted or braised meats.
Of the latter, braising becomes a “go to” for feeding our a busy family of growing teenagers, so when there are several mouths to feed and not a lot of time to do, we turn to our oven, a roll of aluminum foil and a deep casserole dish or oven proof pot to give us flavorful, nutrition filled meals all season long.
Oven braising a large and tougher cut of meat requires minimal equipment, minimal prep and because the cooking is both hands off and over the course of two or three hours, it is a method that allows you time to do other things (hopefully fun things!) while the low, slow heat works its magic.

Key things to remember
Sear it:
Because meat is cooked at low temperature, I like to sear the meat in a large pan or deep pot first, giving the meat color and giving me a base to make a flavorful sauce.

Plan ahead:
Low and slow is key to making tough cuts of meat moist and meltingly tender, so make sure you give yourself at least a couple of hours to let the meat cook. If you can cook the braise a few days ahead of time, all the better! The flavors meld and mellow and the dish is even better when reheated one, two or three days later.

Keep it simple… or not:
Seasoning with a rub or soaking in a brine will do wonders to infuse the meat with flavor or to tenderize a very tough cut, but on the flipside, salt, pepper and some kind of liquid in a sealed container is really all you need to achieve big flavor and tender results.

Know the difference:
Roast = dry (tender cuts of beef, pork and lamb; whole young birds, whole fish; vegetables)

Braise = wet (less tender cuts of beef, pork and lamb; tough, older birds; vegetables)

Know your cuts:
When looking for cuts to use, looks for words like top or bottom round, shoulder, shank, butt, etc. The cuts closest to hoof and horn will be the least expensive and vice versa – cuts furthest from hoof and horn will be the most expensive. For beef, this means top and bottom rounds, chuck, shoulders, shanks and tails (yes, tails!) and for pork, we look for ham, Boston butt and picnic shoulder.

 

Beer Braised Beef with Pork Belly Onions
Serves approximately 4. See Cook’s Notes for non-alcoholic and non-pork substitutes.

Ingredients:

3 to 3 ½ pound of boneless beef round or chuck roast

1 tsp sea or kosher salt plus more to taste

1 tsp cracked/ground black pepper plus more to taste

2 tablespoons of olive or canola oil

2 slices of bacon, roughly chopped

1 medium yellow onion, sliced into half moons

1 medium carrot, finely diced

1 celery rib, finely diced

2 cloves peeled garlic, thinly sliced

12 oz bottle of favorite beer, allowed to go flat

2 cups water

Special Equipment:
4 to 5 quart oven safe pot with heavy lid or deep casserole dish and enough aluminum foil to cover snugly

Suggested Accompaniment:
creamy polenta, mashed potatoes, steamed rice or roasted root vegetables

Cook’s Notes:
Substitute an additional tablespoon of olive or canola oil for the bacon and use red wine or beef broth in place of beer.

Technique:

Sprinkle the roast with salt and pepper. Set aside. Preheat the oven to 325 f.
In a deep, heavy bottomed pot or a large sauce pan, heat the oil over medium high heat, until the oil is shimmering, but not smoking. Add the meat and with tongs, sear all sides until they take on a golden to dark golden color. Remove and let rest on a plate. Turn down the heat to medium low.
Add the bacon and cook until the fat is rendered. Add the sliced onions, stirring in the fat and cooking until just golden – approximately 7 to 10 minutes. Turn the heat back up to medium high and add the garlic, celery and carrots, continuing to cook until the vegetables are slightly soft and golden and the mixture is aromatic, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Carefully, add the beer to the pot or pan, scraping the bottom. Bring to a simmer and let reduce for about 3 to 5 minutes.
If transferring meat to an oven proof casserole, place the meat into the casserole dish and carefully pour the sauce on top. Add water to the dish. Cover tightly with two sheets of aluminum foil, pinching it around the sides to create an airtight “lid”. If using a lidded pot or dutch oven, place the meat back into the pot of sauce, add water and cover with a lid, using parchment paper to create a more airtight seal if necessary.

Place the covered meat and sauce into the preheated oven. Allow to cook in the oven for 2 ½ to 3 hours or until the meat is fork tender.
If possible, allow the meat to sit in the cooler for 2 or 3 days and reheat on the stove top. Serve with suggested accompaniments.

 

by Elena Gustavson, RAFFL’s Everyday Chef
Photo Credit: Elena Gustavson, Supper at the Farm, Craftsbury, VT 2013

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Braised Pork Chops and Turnips

It seems the sun is having a difficult time finding its way to Vermont this spring. And while I’d rather be cooking out on a grill, the perpetual dreariness still has me inside and largely using produce from last season. And that’s alright. But I did finally dig up my garden and plant a few seeds this week and I’m happy about that.

While I’m over the filling stew-like dishes of winter, I like the simplicity of these pork chops and turnips. They’re browned and simmered in one pan and aside from a minimal sauce, don’t need much else. It reminded me of how much I enjoy the combination of braised meat and vegetables. It’s a good technique to know. The particular kind or cut of meat can change, and any root vegetable would work here too.

Braised Porkchops and Turnips

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 – 1 inch thick, bone in pork chops
  • salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 pound turnips or rutabaga, cut into one inch pieces
  • 1 cup white wine, chicken stock, or cider
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 3 tablespoons chopped parsley

Let your pork chops come to room temperature for a few minutes. This helps the meat cook evenly in the pan. Then season both sides with salt and pepper.

Pre-heat a saute pan over medium high heat for a minute or two. Preheating is important, so don’t skip it. Add your oil and let that get hot as well. Both of these steps will help the pork chop, or any piece of meat, in browning. Also, be sure to give the meat plenty of space in the pan.

Let the meat sear, without disturbing, about 3-4 minutes on each side. The meat should sizzle when it hits the pan. If oil starts flying out, cover the pan for a minute and lower the heat a little.We’re not looking to fully cook the pork in this step, just get a nice browning.

When both sides are browned, remove the chops from the pan, set aside, and add in the chopped turnips.

turnips

Then add in the liquid, 2 tablespoons of parsley, butter and brown sugar. Scrape the bottom of the pan to remove anything that might have stuck during browning.Cover, let the turnips simmer for 10-15 minutes, until almost tender, then add the pork chops back in.

The chops should be sitting in the liquid, add a little more if this is not the case, and put the cover back on the pan. simmer for another 5 minutes or so, until the pork is cooked through (at about 145F) and the turnips are completely tender.

pork chop1

Portion the turnips on two plates, top each with a pork chop, juice from the pan and the remaining parsley.

basil

Parmesan Herb Meatballs

I realized earlier this summer that I needed to do some planning ahead. These meatballs were one tactic. Last month, I baked up a large batch and then popped them in the freezer for a quick protein addition for a variety of meals.

I used half ground beef and half ground sausage, which is not entirely the meatball norm, but what I think really makes these stand out is the large amount of fresh herbs.

Basil, parsley and oregano were my choice at the time. Thyme, sage, rosemary, fennel and even mint, could all be interesting though. You might just need to adjust the amount of herbs depending on what you go with. The amount I suggest in the recipe is based on larger leafy herbs like parsley and basil. Use more or less, to your liking.

I started by sauteing some onion with garlic and red pepper flakes.

meatball-mix

Then mixed that together with the ground meat, chopped herbs, plenty of grated Parmesan, an egg and breadcrumbs. Don’t be fooled by the spoon pictured here, meatballs are meant to be mixed and formed by hand. Just wash your hands well before and after handling the meat to avoid contaminating anything. Coating your hands in a little oil before rolling the meatballs could help prevent the meat from sticking to you.

meatballs

I rolled them out just larger than the size of golf balls and browned them in the oven. Once cooled, I slid the whole tray into the freezer. Freezing them separately at first, then transporting them to a freezer bag ensured they didn’t all stick together and that I could easily take just a few out as needed. After I take them out of the freezer, I make sure to cook finish cooking them through, as I was only looking to brown them at first.

How do I use the meatballs? If I remember, I transfer a few from the freezer to the fridge earlier in the day to defrost. A few times, I’ve braised a few in a little broth, thickened the broth to make a sauce, and served them with vegetables and a grain. Or, I’ve gone the traditional route and simmered them in tomato sauce to toss with pasta. I’m craving a meatball sandwich right now, so maybe that’s my next use. No matter what, I’ve saved myself some time trying to put together a balanced meal.

Parmesan Herb Meatballs

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 20 – 25 meatballs

 Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • a pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup loosely packed fresh chopped herbs, such as parsley, basil, mint and oregano
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup bread, cubed
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • A splash of milk

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375F.
  2. Heat the oil in a pan over medium high heat. When hot, add the garlic, red pepper flakes and onion. Saute until translucent, about 8 minutes and season with salt and pepper. Reserve the pan.
  3. In a large bowl combine the meat, egg, herbs, Parmesan, bread, milk, salt and pepper. Use your hands to gently, but thoroughly, combine it all together. It should be very moist. If not, add just a tiny bit more milk. Return your pan to the stove and place a small piece of the meat mixture in the pan to cook through. Taste and adjust the meat seasoning, as needed.
  4. Roll pieces of the meat into balls, just slightly larger than the size of a golf ball. Space them out on a baking sheet. If it’s lined with parchment paper, all the better. You’ll need at least two sheets. Place the sheets in the oven and bake for about 10 minutes. Let the pans cool, then place in the freezer until frozen through. You could place them on a large plate or platter, if that works better for you. When frozen, transfer the meatballs to freezer bags, seal, and use within 3 months for best quality. When ready to use, ensure that the meatballs are heated well and cooked through.
FarmFresh-ConnectLogo

Corn and Bacon Sauté

We kicked off the expansion of Farm Fresh Connect, our local, online farmers market, to the communities of Pittsford and Chittenden last week. We’re pumped to make local food more accessible in these two Vermont towns, both of which have limited shopping opportunities – particularly for locally grown and produced food.
While the pickup of market orders happens at elementary schools in both towns, anyone in either community – whether they work or live nearby – is open to shopping on Farm Fresh Connect.

As part of the promotion of Farm Fresh Connect, at Wednesday pick ups between 3 & 5pm, we’re offering tastings of dishes made with items found on the market. Last week, it was this simple  corn and bacon sauté.

Sweet corn and smoky bacon are just meant to be paired together, which is why I love to start a pot of corn chowder with the fat left behind after cooking bacon. I add in a little zucchini and jalapeno,  if inclined, but almost always include basil. Thyme would work nicely as well.

The result is an excellent side dish for encapsulating the fleeting tastes of summer, though I’ve had a whole bowl as my entire dinner, too.

Hope to see you at one of our market pick-ups!

Corn and Bacon Sauté

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Yield: 4 servings, as a side

Ingredients

  • 1/4 lb bacon
  • 5 ears corn, husked
  • 1/2 onion
  • 1 small zucchini
  • 2 tablespoons minced basil leaves
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 small jalapeno (optional)

Instructions

  1. Chop the bacon into a small dice. In a pan over medium high heat, cook the bacon until crisp, watching closely to avoid burning. When crisp, use a slotted spoon to remove from the pan and set aside on a paper towel lined plate. Remove the pan from the heat.
  2. Slice the kernels off the corn cobs. A good way to do this is to invert a small bowl inside of a larger bowl and stand the cob on the small bowl. As you slice, the kernels will fall into the large bowl. Then, chop the onion and zucchini into a small dice. If using the jalapeno, remove the seeds and chop as well.
  3. Return the pan with the bacon grease to the heat and add the corn, onion, zucchini and optional jalapeno. Cook 8-10 minutes until the pan is dry and vegetables tender.

Roasted Cabbage and Apples with Italian Sausage

cabbage

Roasted Cabbage And Apples With Italian Sausage
Recipe courtesy The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen 

Ingredients
Servings: 4

1/2 head red cabbage, thinly sliced
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 medium apple, sliced
2 sprigs thyme
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
1 lb fresh spicy sausage
Crusty bread (for serving)

Preparation
Active: 10 minutes. Total 45 minutes.
Preheat oven to 400°. Toss cabbage, onion, apple, thyme sprigs, vinegar, 1 Tbsp. oil, and 1/4 cup water in a 13×9″ baking dish; season with salt and pepper and roast, covered, until cabbage is wilted and softened, 35–45 minutes.
Meanwhile, heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Cook sausages until browned and cooked through, 10–12 minutes. Add to cabbage during last 10 minutes of cooking, tossing to coat. Serve with bread.

The Ultimate Onion Tart

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The Ultimate Onion Tart
By Laila Gohar
Servings: 6
Ingredients
  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 2 pounds yellow onions, sliced into rings
  • 2 springs fresh thyme
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup half and half
  • 5 strips bacon, diced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375F. Melt the butter and oil together in a large skillet and add the diced bacon. Cook until the bacon is halfway cooked.

  1. Add the thyme, onion and salt to the skillet. Cook on medium-low heat until the onions are completely translucent and caramelized. This will take around 30 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.
  2. Combine 2 eggs and the half and half in a bowl. Add the caramelized onion mixture and the freshly ground black pepper.
  3. Roll out the puff pastry in a buttered pie or glass dish. (Make sure the pastry has four edges in order to hold the onion mixture.)
  4. Add the mixture to the pastry and bake for 35 minutes or until the crust and top are slightly browned.
  5. Allow to cool, then slice and serve.

White Bean Soup

Having worked in kitchens for several years, Randal Smathers knows how to make a proper soup and has some really great tips to share:

  • Always, always saute veggies well before adding stock or water.
  • Taste the stock alone for flavor. If it’s thin, canned tomato products, bouillon, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, wine, lemon juice, leftover mashed potatoes, herbs or even herbal tea (lemon zinger works well and is vegan-friendly) can bolster a stock.
  • Seasoned yogurt adds flavor and creaminess, especially to plain broths and tomato soups.
  • Adding fresh, finely chopped vegetables to a hot stock just before serving restores color and a little texture to a too-uniform soup.
  • Soups store and reheat well, but if you’re going to store a noodle soup, cook and store the noodles separately or they will balloon up and soak up the stock (barley and rice less so). Always reseason soup after reheating. The flavors tend to blend but also mellow.

At a recent EDC cooking demo Randal discussed this white bean soup as well as a winter squash and leek and potato. While his methods are authentic, they do require a slightly greater time commitment than some of our other recipes. However, much of the cooking is unattended – making this and soups in general, great weekend cooking.

White Bean Soup

1-1 1/2 pounds dried Kenearly beans from Yoder Farm or other yellow/white bean
2 pounds ham hocks or ham bone
3 medium onions
1 stick celery
1 leek
2 cloves garlic
4 carrots
Oil
Pepper
Bay leaf
3 tbsp. baking soda
1/2 pound Wallingford Locker bacon ends (optional)

Soak the beans in cold water with baking soda for at least 6 hours (overnight is better).
Drain beans, cover with fresh cold water, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until just soft (about an hour), stirring occasionally. Drain cooked beans.

Boil ham hocks in a large pot with one onion (halved), one carrot, the bay leaf, half a dozen peppercorns and the celery. DO NOT ADD SALT. This can simmer for 2-3 hours, adding water just to cover bones as needed. Strain stock and let cool. Pick any meat off of the bones, discarding the fat. If you are preparing this in advance, you can cool the stock in the fridge or freezer and skim and discard the congealed fat.

Meanwhile, roughly chop remaining onions and carrots and leek. Smash garlic.

In your biggest, heaviest pot, saute vegetables thoroughly. If you are adding bacon, cut to 1/4 inch dice and saute it with the vegetables. Add the meat from the bones. Add beans and ham stock. Simmer until beans are mostly broken down and the soup has thickened. Add fresh water, stock, or the water the beans cooked in to thin soup as needed (be aware: the bean water will darken the light soup).
Taste, then season with pepper and salt if needed. If you added extra bacon, you should not need more salt.

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