sausage potato vegetable hash credit Julia A Reed (2)

One Pot Meal: Sausage, New Potato & Vegetable Hash

This is my favorite thing to eat in August when corn and green beans are ready, there is lots of summer squash, and new potatoes are just coming in. It’s colorful, full of bright flavors, and totally satisfying for breakfast, lunch, or supper. It’s good cold as leftovers. It practically makes itself, and unlike many of my recipes, this one contains neither garlic nor Parmesan.

Everything but the salt, pepper, and olive oil can be found at Upper Valley farmers’ markets and farm stands or maybe your CSA or backyard. Buy locally! Eat seasonally!

Sausage, New Potato & Vegetable Hash
Serves 4-6 people

Ingredients
4 pork sausages – ideally Italian or garlic
1 red pepper, sliced into strips  (green or pablano are fine too)
1 large red onion, cut into chunks (other onions or equivalent amount of leek or scallions are fine too)
1 pound new potatoes, skins on, sliced ⅛ to ¼ inch thick.
1-2 yellow summer squash or zucchini cut into slices or small chunks (yellow crookneck is my favorite, but hard to find unless you grow them yourself.)
Kernels from an ear or two of corn (use up day- or days-old ears that are drying up in your fridge)
Handful of green beans cut or snapped in half (kale or broccoli are fine in a pinch)
2 T olive oil or fat (lard or chicken fat works well if you have some sitting around)
Salt & pepper
Handful of fresh herbs, chopped (I like cilantro or parsley)sausage potato and late vegetable hash credit Julia A

Directions
1. In a large skillet (10” or so) brown sausages on medium-high heat.

2. When sausages are half cooked, add onions and peppers and some salt.sausage potato and late vegetable hash credit Julia A (4)

3. Let peppers and onions get nice a nd browned before stirring.

4. When sausages are just cooked, remove them and the onions and peppers and set aside. Pour ¼ cup water into the pan to “deglaze” it – that is, get all the tasty browned flavors and bits off the pan. Add this pan juice to the sausages.

5. Wipe out pan to remove any sausage bits left. Heat a couple tablespoons of oil on medium high and add thesausage potato and late vegetable hash credit Julia A (8) thinly sliced potatoes in a single layer. Salt well. Let them brown them well before turning.

6. Add corn kernels, and summer squash. Let veggies brown before turning.

7. Break apart sausage into chunks and add sausage, onions, peppers, and pan juice back into hash along with chopped green beans.

8. Cook until green beans are tender and sausage is heated again. Test a potato too to make sure it’s cooked through.

9. Garnish with fresh chopped herbs. Serve with hot sauce.

Let’s talk about skillets
This hash is ideally cooked in a large skillet so that the vegetables sit in a single layer to brown equally.

Don’t have a nonstick pan? You don’t need one if you add ingredients to a sizzling hot cast iron or steel pan. Then lower heat to medium and don’t turn the ingredients until they’re browned, when they’ll start to release on their own.

Keep an eye out at yard sales or thrift stores for old cast iron or steel skillets as more healthful, more beautiful, and longer lasting alternatives to nonstick pans. (They’re not cheap if you get them new.)

– Bethany Fleishman

Photo credit: Julia A. Reed

Summer squash salad photo Julia A Reed800x600

Summer Squash Salad

I’m making the most of the summer vegetable supply before the first frost shows up – which could be any day now – which is why this light, delicious summer squash salad is a perfect addition to any meal.

This recipe comes to us from the Norwich Inn‘s chef Luis Luna. The Inn served this on the summer menu and Luis was nice enough to share the recipe with Everyday Chef. Luis juliennes the squash with a mandolin –  which makes perfect shoestrings from the summer squash.  I don’t have a mondoline, so, I used a spiralizer – which can make vegetable “noodles” from almost any vegetable. My version wasn’t quite as professional looking, but it still tasted great.

summer squash salad ingredients

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Simply blanch the julienned squash and red peppers for 1 minute, drain and cool.

Mix together the lime juice, honey, water, sweet Thai chili sauce, and chives. combine the blanched vegetables with the sauce and add salt and pepper to taste.

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Summer Squash Salad

4 summer squash, julienne
1 red pepper, julienne
juice from 3 limes
1/3 cup honey
1/3 cup water
1 cup chives, chopped to 2″
1 cup sweet Thai chili sauce
salt and pepper to taste

Summer squash salad photo Julia A Reed250x400

It’s that simple! I love this great new way to enjoy one of my favorite summer vegetables, that is light, easy, a so quick to make!

 

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How To Grill Veggies: Tips and a Few Recipes

We certainly got lucky this past Saturday. Despite the very un-summer like weather we’ve been having, the sun was actually shining. And the deliciously grown foods available at that morning’s market were just waiting to hit the grill. With the expertise of guest chef Randal Smathers, we set up at Rutland’s newest community garden (The Northwest Garden located on the corner of Park and Baxter streets) and demonstrated to neighbors and passersby to how easy and tasty it is to grill fresh vegetables.

Perhaps the biggest takeaway of the event was that almost anything can be grilled. Tomatoes, peppers, squashes, onions, snap peas, fennel and corn were just a few items we used with a degree of success. We don’t suggest grilling rhubarb, however – though it was a fun experiment.

Here are a few of Randal’s grilling tips:

  • Oil the grill – not the veggies. This prevents burning and an unpleasant oily taste. When oiling the grill, do so just lightly and apply with a paper towel. It’s also important to make sure the grill is well cleaned beforehand.
  • It’s much easier to grill the veggies first, then chop. Smaller pieces are more difficult to control when on the grill and it’s easy to lose them down the grates.
  • Pay attention to the grill. Foods can cook pretty quick, especially veggies, and it doesn’t take long for something to burn.

And here’s what we made:

Grilled Veggie Salad. There’s really no recipe for this one. Just grill up your favorite mix of vegetables, slice and toss together with just a little olive oil, salt and any fresh herbs you have on hand.

 

Grilled Salsa

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: about 4 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 ears of corn
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 onion, halved and papery outside skin removed
  • 2 medium – hot peppers (your preference)
  • small bunch of cilantro, chopped
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • hot sauce (optional)
  • lime juice (optional)

Instructions

  1. Soak the ears of corn in water for 30 minutes.
  2. Heat the grill to high heat and lightly coat the crates with olive oil.
  3. Place the corn, tomatoes, onion and peppers on the grill, intact.
  4. Cook until everything is slightly charred.
  5. Let cool a couple of minutes before handling and then remove the corn husks, tomato stem and outer layer of skin on the peppers and onions.
  6. Slice the corn off the cob, chop the onions, peppers, tomatoes and the cilantro.
  7. Toss everything together in a large bowl with some salt, a glug of oil and a splash of lime juice, and a couple dashes of hot sauce, if using.
Grilled Veggie Salad with Honey Yogurt Dressing

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Yield: 4 +

You can use any combo of fresh veggies and herbs here. Try it as a side to meat or main dish tossed with pasta. If you already have grilled veggies leftover, you can put this together in just a couple of minutes.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of mixed grilled veggies sliced into medium sized pieces
  • 1 cup of fresh herbs, chopped (use your favorite mix of summer herbs)
  • 1/2 cup yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon grill seasoning
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • salt

Instructions

  1. Toss all ingredients together in a large bowl. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

ratatouille

End of Summer Ratatouille

Whenever I find myself loaded with tomatoes, peppers, onions, eggplant and summer squash this is what I make. Ratatouille (rat-a-too-ee) is an old classic French vegetable stew that was made popular again a few years back by the Pixar movie of the same name. If you haven’t seen the film, I suggest you do – perhaps tomorrow over a day old dish of this stew.

The theme of the film is that anyone can cook and make delicious food with high quality, yet simple ingredients. That’s awfully similar to the premise of Everyday Chef, isn’t it? Also, the longer the vegetables meld together and break down, the better this dish gets – so I wasn’t joking on trying it the next day. It’s great cold and I often eat it simply on a piece of toasted bread.

I know I’m bringing this to you a bit late in the season and for that I apologize. During the past few weeks much of my time was focused on our Twilight in the Meadow fundraiser, which helps raise money to continue our programs like Everyday Chef. But I saw a ton of tomatoes, peppers and eggplant thriving at the market this past weekend, so it is still very much possible to make. You might be out of luck on the summer squash at this point, but just increase the amount of the other ingredients and use varying colors, or throw in a few others, such as mushrooms or even potato.

I’ve seen ratatouille made many ways. But my favorite is by roasting. I think it’s also the least fussiest method.

Gather your veggies. Peel and slice as needed. I like to do a rough chop and keep everything similar in size. I don’t bother with a fancy presentation. Often you’ll see ratatouille plated with everything sliced paper thin in circles, all the same in size, and arranged perfectly together. But unless you’re trying to impress or are running a restaurant, I don’t think you don’t need to bother. This will still look, and more importantly, taste, good.

 Arrange everything but the tomatoes on a baking sheet and drizzle with of oil, thyme leaves and a few pinches of salt. Roast at 425 for 30-45 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook down the tomatoes on top of the stove in a little heated oil, garlic and red pepper flakes over medium-low heat. Stir occasionally and throw in some salt to taste. When they’re close to done and at a sauce-like consistency, add in a few splashes of red wine vinegar and the basil.

When the veggies are ready – they should look something like this, maybe a little less charred – toss them together with the tomatoes.

You could eat this all by itself topped with some grated Parmesan. But I love to serve it over polenta. Remember, it gets better the next day and the day after that. Bon Apetit.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 medium eggplants
  • 3 medium onions
  • 2 bell peppers
  • 3 zucchini or summer squash
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 tomatoes
  • 1/8 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 cup packed basil leaves
  • 3 sprigs thyme
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • red wine vinegar

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 425.
  2. Peel veggies as needed (especially if your eggplant is not super fresh) and roughly chop into pieces about the same size.
  3. Place all the veggies but the tomatoes on a baking sheet with 1/2 of the garlic, the thyme leaves, a drizzle of oil and a sprinkle of salt.
  4. In a medium sized pot heat a couple tablespoons of oil and then add in the remaining garlic and red pepper flakes. Let cook for a minute, then add in the tomatoes and season with salt.
  5. Allow to cook down over low-medium heat for 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally and being careful not to let the tomatoes splatter.
  6. When nearly done, add in the red wine vinegar and basil.
  7. When the veggies are done roasting, toss with the tomatoes and serve. Top with Parmesan if you’d like. Enjoy by itself or over polenta.
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No Recipe Vegetable Sauce

If you take a look at my fridge or kitchen counter right now you’ll find odds and ends of lingering summer veggies. Green tomatoes on their way to ripening, a couple of Japanese eggplants, all kinds of peppers, mixes of herbs in jars of water and other remnants.

I’m sad to pull be cleaning out the garden – though the bursts of warm temps are surprisingly keeping the peppers and eggplant going, if not at a bit slower of a pace. And I’m still seeing many of these items still at market – but probably not for too much longer now.

Though they might not be in their prime anymore, that certainly doesn’t stop me from finding a use for them. You could should try the ratatouille, or you could do something even easier – just cook everything down in a big saute pot.

Yeah, that’s right. With some tomatoes in there to release their juices (don’t be afraid to use the green ones for a completely different, but still delicious flavor), it doesn’t take long for everything to break down and transform into one awesome vegetable sauce. Just start with some onions and garlic in oil. Add in whatever veggies you have. Season. Toss in some chopped herbs towards the end of cooking. And when it looks sauce-like, use however you want. If it still needs a little flavor, add a splash of vinegar, another pinch of salt, or a few more herbs.

Toss with pasta, fill up tacos, cover a pizza, serve over your favorite grain or just eat it plain. I’ve even freezed sauces like this with some success.

Whatever you do, just don’t let the last of those summer flavors go to waste!

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Mexican Spaghetti Squash with Tropical Salsa

Winter squash has to be my favorite food of the season, followed up by apples and fresh cranberries. But for the longest time there was one winter squash I never liked, the spaghetti.

For many, the pasta like consistency of cooked spaghetti squash is a welcome alternative to actual pasta. That’s a quality I can appreciate, as it opens the door for creativity. Yet I could never get over its overwhelming blandness. No matter how I cooked and seasoned the squash, it always turned out with zero flavor. And so I wrote it off as the black sheep of the winter squash family.

Until now. Finally, in Isa Chandra Moskowitz and Terry Hope Romero’s VeganomiconI found a phenomenal spaghetti squash recipe.  The squash is baked until tender, added to a mildly spicy onion, jalapeno, corn and black bean mixture and then topped with a tomato, avocado and tropical fruit salsa. There are many flavor profiles at play here and they all work. It’s anything but bland.

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The other great aspect of this dish is that it takes advantage of several foods that are perfectly in season right now in early October, including onions, tomatoes, peppers and corn. Seriously, make this now, before tomatoes and peppers have completely disappeared.

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As with any dish that requires roasted squash, I suggest taking care of the roasting  in advance. It really simplifies things. Maybe when you’re relaxing the evening before you’d like to use it, just toss the squash in the oven for about an hour.  If you didn’t plan ahead (and I know how that is) and aren’t opposed to the microwave, you could use it to cook the squash a little faster than the oven.

The flavor of the salsa will only get better after chilling, so consider preparing it in advance as well. With the squash and salsa ready to go, this meal could be ready in 20 minutes.

Mexican Spaghetti Squash with Tropical Salsa

Cook Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients

    • 1 spaghetti squash
For the salsa:
    • 1 cup chopped tomato
    • 1 cup chopped pineapple, mango or papaya
    • 1 avocado, peeled, pitted and chopped
    • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley, cilantro, mint or basil or any combo thereof
    • Juice of 1 lime
For the bean mixture:
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup red wine or vegetable broth
  • 1 cup corn
  • 1 1/2 cups black beans (if canned, drained and rinsed)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Cut the squash in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and place in a baking dish cut side down. Bake until tender and easily pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes. This step can be done up to 3 days in advance.
  2. In a bowl toss all of the salsa ingredients together. Chill until using, which can be up to 2 days in advance.
  3. Heat the oil a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, jalapeno and garlic. Cook about 5 minutes before adding the spices, salt and wine/broth. Cook another 5 minutes. Add the corn and black beans and simmer over low heat until the liquid has reduced and vegetables are tender.
  4. When squash is finished cooking and cool, use a fork to scrape the strands into the pan. Toss with the bean mixture to combine and allow to heat through if the squash was precooked.
  5. Serve in bowls topped with the salsa.

This recipe was adapted (mostly just the seasonings) from Veganomiconan excellent cookbook and resource for vegan and vegetarian cooking.

Grilled Veggie Salad with Honey Yogurt Dressing

 

Photo Courtesy of www.foodandwine.com

Photo Courtesy of www.foodandwine.com

Grilled Veggie Salad with Honey Yogurt Dressing

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Yield: 4 +

You can use any combo of fresh veggies and herbs here. Try it as a side to meat or main dish tossed with pasta. If you already have grilled veggies leftover, you can put this together in just a couple of minutes.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of mixed grilled veggies sliced into medium sized pieces
  • 1 cup of fresh herbs, chopped (use your favorite mix of summer herbs)
  • 1/2 cup yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon grill seasoning
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • salt

Instructions

  1. Toss all ingredients together in a large bowl. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

stuffed squash

Stuffed Pattypan

Have you seen these funky bright yellow squashes? They kind of look like flying saucers. What you might not know is that they’re alien free and taste just like your regular old yellow summer squash. But better.

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I say pattypans are better because let’s be honest – summer squash can be rather bland on its own. The difference with these is that you can scoop out the filling, mix it with a few flavorful ingredients and after briefly baking, have a delicious squash dinner vessel.

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You dig right in and enjoy – just like a stuffed pepper.

Stuffed Pattypan Squash

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Serving Size: 2 as main dish, 4 as a side

 Ingredients
  • 2 3-4 inch wide pattypan squash
  • 2 cups cooked grains
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 small head of broccoli, chopped
  • 1/4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • zest of 1/2 lemon
  • 4 tablespoons grated Parmesan, optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375F.
  2. Set your grains to cook in a small pot on the stove if you don’t already have some ready to go.
  3. Slice the top off the pattypans and using a spoon, scoop out the insides and reserve. If needed, make a TINY slice off the the bottom of the squashes as well to help them stand upright.
  4. Coarsely chop the reserved squash filling.
  5. Heat a saute pan over medium heat with the oil. When hot, add the garlic and onion. Cook for two minutes then add in the broccoli, chopped squash and lemon zest and salt to taste. Cook for another 4-5 minutes.
  6. Toss the veggies with the cooked grains, parsley and seeds. Fill into the hollowed squashes.
  7. Place the stuffed patty pans into a baking dish and bake for about 25 minutes. When the squash is easily pierced with a knife, they’re good to go.
  8. Optional: Top with the sprinkled Parmesan and place under the broiler for 2 minutes.

 

stuffed squash

Slice off the top and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. Give the flesh a good chop and set aside for now. The base of my filling was protein rich quinoa with a handful of dried currants thrown in during cooking. Any grain you like can work, though. You just want to cook it first. So, if you don’t have any cooked grains ready to go – this is your first step.

Cook garlic and onion in a little oil over medium heat. Chop some broccoli and after a couple minutes, mix that into the pan with the squash filling. Season with salt and let cook 5 minutes.

Toss the quinoa, cooked veggies, pumpkin or sunflower seeds, parsley, and zest of 1/2 a lemon together. Now stuff into the hollowed pattypan. Set in a baking dish and bake for 25 minutes at 375F or until the squash is easily pierced with a knife.

Afterwards, you can sprinkle the top with Parmesan and place under the broiler for a couple of minutes to brown.

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What are you waiting for? Get stuffing.

butternut-squash

January Veggie of the Month: Winter Squash

For the month of January, Veggie Of the Month is focused on winter squash. While there are many winter squash varieties out there, my favorite is butternut. I find it easy to work with and versatile. And the great thing is that winter squashes like butternut keep for an extended period of time if stored well – that’s why we’re talking about it in the month of January, when it was harvested sometime in the fall. I found several farmers at the Rutland market carrying them this past weekend.

What I also like is how the butternut squash is used with the pasta. Typically winter squash takes a longer period of time to cook, but we’re going to grate it and that knocks the cooking time down to just a few short minutes.

Getting started

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You want to start by cutting the top off of the squash and carefully slicing down the middle from the top. Just watch your hands. When you’ve cut the squash open use a spoon to scoop out the seeds. Sometimes I save them and roast them to later top salad or soup. But I’ll leave that up to you.
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Some winter squashes, like acorn, are not so easy to peel. Butternut, with its smooth surface, doesn’t take long. Afterwards, you’re going to want to grate the squash with a handheld grater or with the proper disc attachment on your food processor. I found it easier to grate by hand by breaking a half into smaller, easier to handle pieces.

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One of my favorite pairings with butternut squash is sage. If you haven’t already, check out the butternut squash, apple and sage soup I made in the fall. You’re going to want to roughly slice the sage leaves into smaller pieces, but you don’t need to go crazy.

Before serving, I top the pasta with toasted walnuts. You shouldn’t be intimidated about toasting nuts. Toasting noticeably enhances the flavor. And as long as you don’t forget about them, it’s easy. Just place them in a pan over medium high heat as you prep the rest of the ingredients. Give the pan a shake once in awhile. They’ll be done when you notice a slight browning and nutty aroma.

 

 

  Penne with butternut squash, sage and walnuts

butternut-squash-and-sage

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 5 cups shredded butternut squash (from about 1/2 peeled medium squash)
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh sage
  • 1 pound penne or pasta of your choice
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped, toasted walnuts
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (optional)

Start a large pot of water over high heat for the pasta.

Heat oil and butter in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Add garlic, onion, and red pepper flakes. Cook for about two minutes before adding in the squash and sage. Stir occasionally, until squash begins to brown, about 4 minutes.

When the water is boiling, add a couple pinches of salt and the pasta. When cooked al dente, drain, reserving 2 cups of the cooking water.

Add pasta and 1/2 cup pasta water to the squash and stir to coat. Cook over medium heat, stirring, adding more cooking liquid as needed, until squash coats pasta. Divide pasta among bowls and top with the walnuts and cheese, if using.

Recipe adapted from bonappetit.com

butternutsquashsoup

Butternut Squash, Apple and Sage Soup

What’s better than roasted squash on a fall day? Combine it with some fresh apple cider and make soup.

I was having friends over for dinner two nights this weekend and made up a large batch of this to serve as first courses for both. I don’t often serve full, proper courses for dinner, but I have winter squash hiding out in every corner of my small apartment. And yet, I still buy more. There are so many great varieties and uses, I can contentedly eat it for the next six months.

This soup has an interesting ingredient – Worchestshire sauce. In case you’ve ever wondered -Worcestershire Sauce, dating back to the 19th century, is an English blend of brined anchoviess, tamarinds (an Indian date-like fruit), molasses, garlic, vinegar, chilies, cloves, shallots and sugar. It’s an interesting and yet underutilized staple ingredient. So, no wonder, it would add a nice boost to this, and probably, most soups.

Fresh sage helps make this kind of awesome as well. Again, another ingredient I don’t take advantage of often enough. When I do use them, I like to saute them up in a pan with a little oil and fry until crisp. Fried sage leaves would make an excellent garnish to this soup.

Butternut Squash, Apple and Sage Soup

serves 8

4 pounds butternut squash (about 2 medium )
8-10 sage leaves; chopped
2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
salt and pepper
splash of maple syrup
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 large shallot; minced
4 cups chicken stock
1 cup apple cider
1 Tablespoon dark brown sugar
4 dashes Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes; or more to taste
splash of heavy cream
1 large apple; finely diced

Preheat oven to 425 F. Halve each butternut squash and scoop out the seeds. Sprinkle with sage, maple syrup, salt and pepper. Dot with butter. Roast 45-1 hour until the squash is tender. Remove from oven, allow to cool slightly, then scoop out flesh.

Heat olive oil in a large sauce pot. Add in shallot and sauté over medium-low heat until tender, about 5 minutes. Add in scooped out butternut squash, chicken stock, apple cider, brown sugar, Worcestershire, nutmeg and red pepper flakes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a simmer and cook 30 minutes.

Puree with an immersion blender. Return to pot, taste and adjust seasonings. At the last minute, stir in heavy cream and serve garnished with diced apple, fried sage leaves, or a spoonful of Greek yogurt, swirled.

Adapted from thekitchn.com.

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