New Help for Renters, Landlords, Homeowners

To help landlords and tenants facing pandemic-related financial problems, refer to this resource sheet created by Upper Valley Strong, a coalition made up of over 35 non-profit organizations, agencies and town representatives who come together during times of crisis, such as COVID-19. Further information about promoting safe practices in your housing community can be found on the Upper Valley Strong website.

New Hampshire:

Funding from the CARES Act will be available to NH residents for rental assistance.  The five Community Action Program (CAP) agencies in NH will be administering the funds.  There are 2 types of assistance:

  • A one-time grant (up to $2,500) for past due rent (from April 2020) or other housing-related expenses as a result of lost household revenue or increased household expenses (must be related to COVID-19).  This grant program is targeted to those households who will be able to maintain their housing without assistance after the one-time assistance payment.
  • Short-term rental assistance for those who are looking to maintain or secure permanent housing (includes first month’s rent and ongoing short-term rental assistance).

What You Should Know:

  • Both the one-time grants and the short-term rental assistance will be coupled with regional case management services to help connect households to appropriate services as defined by the household and the agency.
  • There are no income guidelines, but the loss of income or additional expense must be COVID-related.
  • An Eviction Notice is not required, but a Demand for Rent or ledger is necessary.
  • You do not need to have met with your city/town welfare first in order to get access to funding.
  • Program payments will be made directly to the landlord or provider.
  • The program will end by December 30, 2020.

How to Apply:

  • Online at the TCCAP interest form website.
  • Applications will be online, but paper copies can be requested
  • If you need help applying, you can contact:

If the amount of arrears cannot be cured by rental assistance from the CARES Act, tenants can apply for additional rental assistance from City/Town Welfare.

Vermont:

Rental Housing Stabilization Fund:

 

Mortgage Assistance Program:

  • The VT Housing Finance Agency (VHFA) for HOMEOWNERS for mortgage assistance – applications will open July 13 through August 31 and will pay up to 3 mortgage payments per household for VT primary homeowners who’ve had closings before March 1 and who are income-eligible: https://www.vhfa.org/map

Re-Housing Recovery Fund:

Emergency housing rehabilitation grants and forgivable loans to make up to 250 units of housing available to re-house homeless families experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 outbreak.

AREA OF NEED:

  • Homeless Families/Substandard Existing Rental
  • Housing Stock Grant and forgivable loans disbursed by housing service provider(s) selected by RFP process with oversight authority through Vermont Department of Housing and Community Development.

How to Apply:

For up more information about how to apply for funds through the state of Vermont, please visit the Vermont Economic Recovery and Relief Package Website.

Additional Resource in VT:

Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA): SEVCA provides a wide variety of services to individuals and families in Windham and Windsor Counties, including utility and housing assistance; help accessing State and local support networks like 3SquaresVT, supplemental fuel assistance, medical insurance, unemployment benefits, etc.; financial literacy courses; small business development; tax assistance; weatherization services; Head Start; advocacy, information, and referrals; and thrift stores. SEVCA is also available to help people affected by COVID-19 find, explore, and access options for recovery and stabilization. Visit the SEVCA Website for more details.

Upper Valley Housing Update

A quick update on Upper Valley housing from our Workforce Housing Coordinator, Mike Kiess:

Support for people experiencing homeless and housing insecurity has been expanded on both sides of the river. In Vermont, the state has provided vouchers for 130 people without housing to stay in hotels. Thanks to the Super 8, South on Five, White River Junction Inn, and Comfort Inn for being partners in this effort. At the same time, organizations like the Upper Valley Haven that help with homelessness and housing insecurity are expanding services and outreach. Another example is LISTEN Community Services, which is providing free meals to those sheltering in White River Junction.  

There is concern moving forward that economic disruption from the pandemic will increase homelessness and housing insecurity. NH and VT advocacy groups are asking Concord and Montpelier to allocate CARES funds to continue expanded shelter and service support. Local organizations, such as Continuum of Care and Upper Valley Strong’s housing committee, are also working towards long term solutions. The goal is to help connect community members with available housing, possibly by working out deals with landlords or providing rent assistance. 

It is still too early to predict what the consequences for housing and housing finance markets will be. While a rise in joblessness and a fall in incomes is expected to hurt the housing market, demand among those who live in urban areas for “get away” locations could cause prices to rise. March real estate data did not show any decrease in transactions, which had started the year on a strong note. April data shows that prices have risen and supply has diminished as potential sellers are waiting to enter the market.

Going forward, housing affordability and availability is expected to remain a challenge, and the pandemic may be shifting our solutions. It does not seem that development costs will be reduced by the economic disruption, while public and business investor development funds are likely to be impacted. At the same time, there seems to be increased openness to creative partnerships for incremental creation of workforce housing through smaller projects and renovations.

Housing: Regional Challenge—Local Solutions

Housing: Regional Challenge—Local Solutions

We live, work, shop, and play across state and town lines, so it makes sense to work together to meet our shared housing challenge.

Here is what some towns are doing, and how you can be part of the change.

Tunbridge, Strafford, Sharon, and Royalton have launched a task group to work on creating more homes together. Contact Ken Wright to get involved.
Mt. Ascutney Hospital is sponsoring a work group to reduce barriers to housing in their service area—Barnard, Pomfret, Hartford, Killington, Bridgewater, Woodstock, Hartland, Plainfield, Plymouth, Reading, West Windsor, Windsor, Cornish, and Weathersfield. Contact Faye Grearson or Mike Kiess to be part of this effort.
The Lebanon Planning Board is hearing about ideas for hundreds of apartments near the DHMC campus and welcomes your participation to learn more and share your ideas. Find out about meeting dates and agendas, and let Jim Wasser or Billy Cioffredi know if you want updates.
The Woodstock Community Trust put a house into the market at a price targeting a resident working family. Bennington‘s Healthy Homes project is refurbishing abandoned houses for purchase at moderate prices. Contact Jill Davies or Kevin Dailey to see if these ideas could be adapted to your town.

Business Leaders Housing Breakfast

We had a packed house at the Fall Business Leaders Housing Breakfast, with more than 180 community members registered to attend.

We gained insights on the housing challenges facing the Upper Valley from Dartmouth College geographer Garrett Dash Nelson, plus got an update on the region’s real estate market from Buff McLaughry of Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty and Lynne LaBombard of Housing Solutions Real Estate. Find the morning’s presentations on our Workforce Housing page, and contact Mike Kiess (Michael@VitalCommunities.org) for more information.

Vital Communities on NHPR’s “The Exchange”

GoingLocal_1Did you catch us recently on New Hampshire Public Radio’s weekday call-in show “The Exchange“? Their ‘Going Local‘ series explores the different regions of the state, and in early August they focused on the Dartmouth/Lake Sunapee region (the New Hampshire side of the Upper Valley!).

Vital Communities was honored to have Energy Program Manager Sarah Brock join as a panelist, along with Hanover Town Manager Julia Griffin, Lebanon Planning and Zoning Director David Brooks, and Valley News Reporter Tim Camerato. They talked about everything from traffic congestion on Route 120 to a bi-state parade from Orford to Fairlee—give it a listen!

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