“Light River Junction” Kicks Off May 7 with “Toons and Tones”

The celebratory summer series Light River Junction First Fridays with WRIF kicks off May 7 with a fantastic line-up called “Toons and Tones.” Throughout downtown White River, there will FREE outdoor arts to inspire and amuse, with an emphasis on young local artists: a filmmaking workshop, live music, selected footage from the creative minds of CATV, projected short films (such as Formation of a River, above), and even an audio-visual beat set to get us moving after a long pandemic year of isolation.

In the words of the organizers, “We are celebrating the bright, colorful days ahead with a vibrant showcase of music and movies by local artists. Downtown White River Junction is set to become a canvas for light and sound! Throughout the night, on every corner in WRJ, there will be space for discovery. Local musicians, including Jakob Breitbach and Rob Oxford, will be playing acoustic sidewalk sets. Projections and movie screens of every size will be showing myriad images from CATV’s extensive local archives, curated by Chico Eastridge. In shop windows, on walls, you can revel in the little delights of curated short films, hand-picked to color the sonic canvas of the night. Swap the digital for the physical and get hands-on in a “cameraless filmmaking” workshop with local analog filmmaker Quinn Thomashow. After handling the real substance of film we’ll watch a program of shorts made on 16mm and Super 8 film, with live accompaniment. Plainfield’s Rah Zen will perform a swirling beat set while Lana Real transforms the historic Bell Building into a fantasy of ‘Electric Dreams.’ It will be a journey in sound and color from start to finish.”

As always, be sure to follow the latest COVID-19 protocols!

Light River Junction First Fridays with WRIF aims to revitalize White River Junction’s “First Friday” celebrations, disrupted by COVID, by attracting people of all ages back to the village through film and media arts. On White River Junction First Fridays (May 7, June 4, July 2, and August 6), WRIF will transform downtown parking lots into an attractive forum for safe dining and cinema viewing. Film, including work by local filmmakers, will be projected in novel ways in spaces enhanced by local visual artists. The project is expected to revive social interaction and economic activity through the arts in reimagined and ongoing ways that can offer inspiration to other Vermont communities. The project is made possible by an $18,000 grant from The Vermont Community Foundation (VCF), the Agency of Commerce and Community Development (ACCD), and the Better Places partners.

The grant was obtained by a partnership centered on White River Indie Films (WRIF) and including the Town of Hartford, the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce, Vital Communities, CATV (Community Access Television), the Briggs Opera House, the Center for Cartoon Studies, and local businesses and film and media artists.

Time Location Activity Descriptions
5-7 pm Behind Revolution 16mm Cameraless Filmmaking Workshop With Quinn Thomashow
5-6 Out on the sidewalks Music Performances Acoustic street performances by local musicians including Jakob Breitbach and Rob Oxford
8-11 pm Town Crier CATV Playlist 8 hours of Local Archives curated by Chico Eastridge
5-9 pm Revolution & Scavenger Window Movies Selected visual music films, Here in the Valley highlights
8-9 pm Lamphouse Micro-cinema Short films Curated short films
8-9 pm Main Stage at Coolidge Parking Lot Short film program

Visual Music Short Films 

Scream Tone – (Joe Dery)

Glistening Thrills  (Jodie Mack)

Films by Rich Fedorchak 

With live accompaniment 

by Amy Garapic et al…

Brief Glimpses on the Way to Joy, Part 1 (Rich Fedorchak, 19 mins, color, sound)

8-9 pm Bell Building Projections

Aged in Wood (Bruce Posner)

Strafford/Tunbridge One Planet Cameraless Film

Formation of a River (JE Crawford)

Vacationland (Matt McWilliams)

9-10 Bell Building Projections Electric Dreams – A projection mapping performance by Lana Real
9-10 Main Stage at Coolidge Parking Lot Performance Audio-visual beat set by Rah Zen

 

Putting Your Money to Work Locally

More Free “Local Investment” Events starting April 8!

“Market forces” got you down? Does it seem like Big Finance keeps putting resources toward things that create more environmental damage and human inequality?

Maybe it’s time you took the reins of your own financial resources and made them work for positive change where you can see it: right here in your community. Why fund Wall Street when you can direct your money toward Main Street?

Vital Communities and its partners (including The Local Crowd Monadnock) have added four more free events in our series entitled “Put Your Money Where Your Life Is”: Reclaiming Our Local Economy“:
  • Investing for Home Creation, Thursday, April 8, 5:30 pm: Your savings can help create more lower cost homes. Learn how even small amounts can bring financial, social, and environmental rewards.

  • Put Your Money to Work Locally: Investment Clubs 101, Thursday, April 15, 5:30 pm: Interested in investing locally but don’t want to do it alone? Investment clubs pool money to collectively invest in local businesses and bring a social aspect to the process – they make investment fun! Join Matt Cropp from the Vermont Solidarity Investment Club to learn the ins and outs of starting your own investment club, as well as some ideas about what to look for if you want to join an established club and increase your power to do good by investing as a group.

  • Seeding Change: The Power of Conscious Commerce (2021), viewable on demand April 22-24: a documentary on how consumers can help save the world “one purchase at a time” and “triple bottom line” businesses that consider the social, environmental and financial impacts of their companies and address some of today’s most challenging issues. This award-winning documentary empowers viewers to be part of the solution by voting with their dollars and supporting the brands and products that align with their environmentally conscious values.
    Part of the Monadnock Region Earth Day Film Festival.
  • Put Your Money to Work Locally: Community Loan Funds 101, Tuesday, April 27, 5:30 pm: Community loan funds are a home grown solution for investing in our communities, energy independence, and working lands. Join us for a deep dive into impact investing with Vermont and New Hampshire community loan funds.

Sign up here to receive lively weekly email companion pieces to these events, starting March 30!

These events and material are educational in nature and should not be construed as specific legal, accounting, or investment recommendations.

Check out resources on our new “Invest Local page!

Don’t miss these great opportunities to increase your financial IQ!

Our Vital Economy

The series is part of Vital Communities’ ongoing “Vital Economy” program—initiatives that teach people the importance of buying and investing locally and offer how-tos and incentives. One step was sponsoring the Upper Valley Indie Impact Study (2020), which found that businesses rooted in the Upper Valley keep up to 4 times more money circulating in the region’s economy than do national chain stores, and that remote online retailers suck hundreds of millions of dollars from our economy each year.

Local businesses create stable jobs, enhance community character, and support our communities with donations of time and money, and have proven to be especially critical during the pandemic. Now, after a year of COVID shutdowns, bankruptcies, deaths, and economic despair, it’s all the more important to channel our resources to the local businesses and organizations that sustain us. In fact, it’s an opportunity to relocalize our economy—catalyzing innovation and shifting capital to where we live to fuel the entrepreneurs, businesses, and projects our communities need to be more sustainable, vibrant, and resilient in the face of future disruptions and challenges.

Crowdfunding Available for NH Projects

New Hampshire businesses, farmers, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, community initiatives: Do you have an incredible project just waiting to happen? Want to grow your organization, our community, and the local economy, but don’t have access to capital?

The Local Crowd Upper Valley is a rewards-based local crowdfunding platform that helps communities invest in local businesses, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, and initiatives that are mission-driven social enterprises. If your organization contributes to the community and could use a lift, apply to be part of a Route 11 Corridor cohort of campaigns.
Vital Communities is partnering with TLC Monadnock to bring local investment and capital access to the Route 11 Corridor of New Hampshire thanks to funding from USDA Rural Development.

Selected Route 11 Corridor proposals will receive a $500 stipend to produce a crowdfunding campaign video. Studies show that crowdfunding campaigns with videos raise four times more funds than campaigns without videos.

All crowdfunding campaign teams receive hands-on technical assistance to help them launch a successful crowdfunding campaign. Campaign teams also receive a free crowdfunding assessment to ensure that they receive the coaching and training that best fits each team’s needs.

Submit a proposal for 2021 crowdfunding campaigns if:

  • Your organization is based in Claremont, Newport, Kearsarge Region
  • Your project is budgeted for under $10,000 .
  • Your project is simple, achievable, and will generate excitement in your community (and, if part of a bigger project, has stand-alone value.)
  • Your project will create an economic and/or social benefit to your business and the community
  • You are able to invest time to build a successful fundraising campaign

Sample project ideas: Farm infrastructure, renewable energy installation, community garden or art project, vehicle to expand nonprofit service, capital to launch a new rural enterprise, food business equipment

Submit your project proposal by May 7, 2021

The Local Crowd Upper Valley will select up to eight projects to participate in this crowdfunding cohort, based on the potential of each project to positively impact their local economy and community. Selected proposals will launch their campaigns in 2021, with support and guidance from The Local Crowd Advisors.
The Local Crowd Upper Valley FAQ here.
 

The Local Crowd details:
You (project/campaign creator) will need to:

  • Form a Campaign Team to actively promote your fundraising project
  • Work closely with the The Local Crowd team to leverage training, marketing, and community outreach tools
  • Adhere to the keys of success promoted by The Local Crowd platform:  YOU share with your personal network. YOU make it happen.

You will receive:

  • Support from The Local Crowd team to run a successful funding campaign
  • Access to business development support from project partners including NH SBDC and SBA
  • Marketing and outreach support to spread the word about your project
  • Free Crowdfunding Readiness Assessment ($85 value)
  • Funds raised via the crowdfunding campaign for the designated project (less platform and credit card fees)
  • Opportunity to reduce platform fees if you meet campaign milestones

Questions? Contact 

nancy@vitalcommunities.org

Community. Connection. Capital.

The hottest spot in White River Junction this summer? A parking lot!

An underutilized parking lot behind the Hotel Coolidge in downtown White River Junction will become a vibrant, pandemic-safe place to eat, visit, and watch films and projection art this summer, thanks to an $18,000 grant from The Vermont Community Foundation (VCF), the Agency of Commerce and Community Development (ACCD), and the Better Places partners.

The project also helps re-start the downtown’s First Friday celebrations, suspended due to the pandemic, with community arts projects and light and sound installations to re-animate the entire downtown and celebrate the arts community centered there.

The grant was obtained by a partnership centered on White River Indie Films (WRIF) and including the Town of Hartford, the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce, Vital Communities, CATV (Community Access Television), the Briggs Opera House, the Center for Cartoon Studies, and local businesses and film and media artists.

Light River Junction First Fridays with WRIF” aims to revitalize White River Junction’s “First Friday” celebrations, disrupted by COVID, by attracting people of all ages back to the village through film and media arts. From May to August, WRIF will transform downtown parking lots into an attractive forum for safe dining and cinema viewing. Film, including work by local filmmakers, will be projected in novel ways in spaces enhanced by local visual artists. The project is expected to revive social interaction and economic activity through the arts in reimagined and ongoing ways that can offer inspiration to other Vermont communities.

“The vision originated in WRIF’s experimental ‘Light River Junction Festival of Cinema Light,’ a weekend of outdoor projection in downtown White River Junction,” explained WRIF Board Member Samantha Davidson Green. “In December 2020, we shouted out to local filmmakers, who shared their work freely for the public to enjoy safely—whether by car or through snow on foot—projected on buildings and in shop windows. Its success revealed how much the community craves the shared experience of art and the potential for re-imagining cinema and media arts events to draw people back to our hurting downtown businesses. The Better Places grant enables WRIF to partner with an amazing team of local organizations and the Town of Hartford, many of whom pioneered the First Friday celebrations years ago, in our efforts to revitalize our local economy and heal our community fabric through the arts.”

The project’s main site is the parking area at 40-50 Currier Street, behind the Hotel Coolidge and Gates-Briggs building, which owns the lot and supports the project. The lot is bordered on several sides by white-sided buildings that will serve as projection surfaces for cinema and moving image installation art. In addition, a portable screen will be erected in one end of the lot for screening high-resolution feature film content after dark. The site is adjacent to the Wolf Tree Bar and in walking distance from a half-dozen restaurants, making it convenient for outdoor dining.

The project also involves a number of other aspects, including community art projects and smaller film and video projections and sound installations at spots throughout downtown, with changing content by local filmmakers and sound artists.

These activities will be part of White River Junction First Fridays, which are scheduled for May 7, June 4, July 2, and August 6.

The project’s organizers see its impact as three-fold:

  • Boosting the local economy by stimulating downtown shopping and dining;
  • Helping our recovery from the social isolation of COVID with programming that is welcoming to all and accessible by public transportation; and
  • Supporting the creative economy—which has been particularly hard-hit by the pandemic shutdowns—by drawing people back to arts-rich White River Junction and showcasing works by local and emerging film and media artists, including participants in the Vermont- and New Hampshire-wide Freedom & Unity Young Filmmakers’ Contest and a CATV-sponsored Film Slam/festival.

The White River Junction project was one of only eight chosen from among 63 applications representing 54 communities across the state from Canaan to Pownal and Alburgh to Brattleboro. A total of $129,275 was awarded.

These grants will help communities reimagine and reopen public spaces for safe dining, shopping, and recreation, while showcasing the state’s unique sense of place. The community-driven projects ranged from village green and park improvements, to public art installations, alley activations, community arts centers, music and performing arts series, as well as other grassroots projects that bring people together safely in public spaces.

“Better Places grants are an important tool in our toolbox to help revitalize our communities as we recover from the pandemic,” said Governor Phil Scott. “I want to thank the Vermont Community Foundation, the National Life Foundation, the Vermont Arts Council, the Preservation Trust of Vermont, and the Vermont Department of Health for their work on this program as we support improvements in towns and villages across the state.”

“Public spaces can tell a story about our communities—they bring us together when accessible or leave us isolated when they aren’t,” says Vermont Community Foundation President and CEO Dan Smith. “The Community Foundation is committed to working with other state leaders to support projects that bring people together safely and contribute to the recovery and resilience of our economy, culture, and sense of connection.”

“First Fridays” started more than ten years ago through the collaboration of local businesses such as Revolution with the Center for Cartoon Studies, Main Street Museum, and others to celebrate downtown, becoming a community ritual gathering around the arts and local commerce.

With the exception of the past year, WRIF has presented an annual film festival and special screenings since its 2004 founding, in various downtown locations, at times in conjunction with First Fridays. WRIF and CATV have also partnered for film slams and screenings.

“Put Your Money Where Your Life Is”: Reclaiming Our Local Economy

“Put Your Money Where Your Life Is”:
Reclaiming Our Local Economy

Event series focuses on local investment as a tool for rebuilding our region’s economy

“When the pandemic recedes, we all will be called upon to take extraordinary steps to revive the local businesses that serve as the foundation of our communities. One critically important step will be for you and other members of your community to move your investment capital from Wall Street to Main Street.”                                       

– Michael Shuman, Community Economist  

After a year of COVID shutdowns, bankruptcies, deaths, and economic despair, how can we, as individuals, help rebuild our economy and community? A series of events and workshops over the next several months aims to provide information and resources about local investment AND opportunities for action. Yes, opportunities−in addition to the economic disruption and heartache, the pandemic has brought opportunities for relocalizing our economy, catalyzing innovation, and shifting capital to where we live to fuel the entrepreneurs, businesses, and projects our communities need to be more sustainable, vibrant, and resilient.

The Upper Valley Indie Impact Study reported that businesses rooted in the Upper Valley keep up to 4 times more money circulating in the region’s economy than national chain stores, and that remote online retailers suck hundreds of millions of dollars from our economy each year. Local businesses create stable jobs, enhance community character, and support our communities with donations of time and money, and have proven to be critical resources during the pandemic emergency. Browse resources on how to invest locally!

Increasing the development and success of more locally based businesses and innovations will make our region more resilient and strengthen our economy so that we can better handle future disruptions and challenges. Investment in these enterprises is critical to their success. Reclaiming our economy will require that we all “invest” in our future−whether by committing to shop locally more and click less, or by actually investing some retirement savings in the sectors, businesses, or projects that will make the Upper Valley a better place to live, work, and play for generations.  The goal of this series is to build awareness of the ways we can currently invest in reclaiming our economy as we recover from economic disruption, and to find new and creative tools and networks to move money from Wall Street to Main Street.

Many thanks for the sponsors of this event series: Mascoma Bank, King Arthur Baking Company, Savings Bank of Walpole, Hanover Co-op Foods Stores, Valley News, Monadnock Food Co-op, Green Energy OptionsNorwich Solar Technologies, LaValley Building Supply, The Local Crowd, The Keene Sentinal

Learn more about local investing on our resource page

Local Investment 101: How to Reboot the Region’s Economy After COVID-19

March 4, 11, 18, 25, 2021

5:30 to 7:00 pm

A four-session virtual workshop designed to help grassroots investors and community groups develop practical, local investment strategies, to fuel innovation and resilience in the community.  
Presenter: Michael Shuman, Community Economist and Author of Put Your Money Where Your Life Is

Small businesses throughout Vermont and New Hampshire have been devastated by the COVID-19 pandemic and related shutdowns, as have the local economies that depend on them. One readily available solution—one that does not depend on government bureaucracies—is to mobilize grassroots investment. Americans now have $56 trillion in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, pension funds, and insurance funds—nearly all of it invested in global corporations. Here in the Upper Valley, one conservative estimate is that there are $5-6 billion in locally managed investments; this figure does not include the untold billions invested by local residents but managed out of state. 

Recent changes in the law (around investment crowdfunding, for example) make it cheaper and easier for nonaccredited investors to put money into local businesses. However, most of us believe we have no choice but to continue to invest our money in the stocks and bonds of the world’s biggest companies, even if we barely understand them. There are real alternatives, but few of us know about or consider them. In fact, you can invest in everything that matters to you. You can put your money into that neighborhood grocery store you love, your little sister’s first house, or your nephew repayment of high-interest student loans. If you’re smart about local investing, you can do this in a way that provides substantial, stable financial returns and lower risk than for Wall Street investments. Plus, local investments come with social returns on investment and wind up strengthening your community, local resilience, and the tax base.

Local Investment 101 aims to help participants answer three essential questions:

  1. How can I rebuild my community and the local economy after the ravages of COVID-19?
  2. How can I make my community more resilient to better prepare for future global crises?
  3. How can I move my money into the businesses, projects, places, and people I know and love?
Workshop structure:
Four 90-minute Zoom sessions built around 15 videos (20-40 minutes each) with homework assignments to be completed prior to each scheduled session.

Session 1

  • Introduction of the class objectives, materials, and assignments.   
  • Introductions of classmates to one another.  
  • Introduction to the first eight videos.

Session 2 

  • Review of the first eight videos.
  • Preparation for assignment #1 (a personal investment strategy).
  • Introduction to the final seven videos.

Session 3 

  • Presentation and discussion of assignments.  
  • Review of seven videos. 
  • Preparation for assignment #2 (a community strategy).

Session 4

  • Presentation and discussion of assignments.
  • Next steps.
Who should attend?

The Local Investment 101 series is intended to help grassroots investors, businesses looking for capital, and policymakers committed to facilitating local investment.

Cost:

$100 fee for the entire four-part series. Scholarships are available upon request (contact nancy@vitalcommunities.org).

About the presenter: 

Michael Shuman is an author and leading visionary on community economics, serving as Director of Local Economy Programs for Neighborhood Associates Corporation and Adjunct Professor at Bard Business School in New York City. He is also a Senior Researcher for Council Fire and Local Analytics, where he performs economic-development analyses for states, local governments, and businesses around North America. His three most recent books are:

  • Put Your Money Where Your Life Is: How to Invest Locally Using Solo 401ks and Self-Directed IRAs
  • The Local Economy Solution: How Innovative, Self-Financing Pollinator Enterprises Can Grow Jobs and Prosperity
  • Local Dollars, Local Sense: How to Shift Your Money from Wall Street to Main Street

Register for Local Investment 101 Workshop Series

 

Local Investment: An Introduction

February 23, 5:30-7 pm

What is local investing? What can it do for a community? Why is it important? Who can do it, and how? Join us for a panel discussion with local and regional entities that are mobilizing local capital for local businesses, projects, and people. 

Panel participants:

  • The White River Investment Club – Peter Reed and Charlie Page
  • New Hampshire Community Loan Fund – John Hamilton
  • Vermont Community Loan Fund – Will Belongia
  • The Local Crowd – Jen Risley
  • Norwich Solar Technology Community Investment Impact

A virtual conversation to learn more about local investing from the people already doing it, and learn how you can put your money to work right here at home.  Watch this event recording.

Learn more about local investing on our resource page

Thank you to the Series Sponsors:

   

Mascoma Bank is a Certified B Corporation® which means we use “business as a force for good.” Practically speaking, being a B Corp™ inspires us to consider the impact of our business decisions on our communities, our customers, our employees, and our environment. It is helping us to discover new ways we can deliver positive change in the cities and towns where we work and live. For 120 years, Mascoma Bank has put community first. Our status as a B Corp™ is just the latest example of our commitment to the communities we serve.

   

King Arthur Baking Company is an employee-owned company, every one a bakers at heart. There mission is to be the ultimate resource and inspiration in the kitchen, to inspire connections and community through baking, and to use our business as a force for good.

  
The Hanover Co-op Food Stores‘ vision is a well-nourished community cultivated through cooperation. With locations in Vermont and New Hampshire, the Co-op Food Stores is owned by more than 20,000 families, and is one of the oldest and most successful co-ops in the United States. Serving the good folks of the Upper Valley since 1936! Anyone can shop, member or not.

 

The Valley News is the Upper Valley’s source for news, sports, and more serving 22 western New Hampshire communities and 24 communities in eastern Vermont.

The Monadnock Food Co-op is a community-owned food store offering a diverse selection of local, organic, and natural foods to the Monadnock Region. The Co-op is located at 34 Cypress Street in Keene, NH.

 

For more than 145 years now, Savings Bank of Walpole takes very seriously the responsibility that comes with being our community’s truly local bank. We’re here to provide financial products that are in our customers’ best interest, not ours. It is and always has been the very foundation of our existence. More importantly, as the only bank headquartered right here in our community, we know that we are in business because of our community and for our community. This is our only home – and we know we cannot continue to thrive or survive without a strong local economy.

 

 

The leader is commercial, municipal & institutional solar solutions. Norwich Solar Technologies‘ mission is to continue to advance the integration and deployment of affordable solar power for regional organizations – enabling them to improve their bottom line while reducing their carbon footprint. Our clients include municipalities, community services institutions, schools, businesses large and small, and community solar residential clients.

 

Green Energy Options is a mission based certified B Corporation that supports the use of cleaner, more efficient, and renewable sources of energy. Specializing in residential solar, home heating and cooling, our team of energy experts provides friendly advice, quality products, and excellent installations to homeowners in the Monadnock Region and beyond. We listen carefully to our customers so that we can offer the best products for their needs. Our goal is 100% customer satisfaction. Please stop in, meet the team, take a tour of our showroom and talk about our shared vision for a healthy local economy and environment.

      

 

Series Partners:

       

Video Excerpts: “Buy Local to Feed Local: Upper Valley Everyone Eats,” Nov. 24

At a virtual gathering on November 24, people from social service agencies and restaurants across the Upper Valley gave powerful testimony about the beneficial impact Upper Valley Everyone Eats has had on local farms, restaurants, and people in need.

Upper Valley Everyone Eats is the local hub of Vermont Everyone Eats, which pays hard-hit Vermont restaurants $10/meal to prepare free, nutritious meals for Vermonters in need. Vermont Everyone Eats is funded by the federal Coronavirus Relief Fund and made possible through a grant provided by the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development to Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA). Upper Valley Everyone Eats will provide ~40,000 meals to patrons across 17 meal sites between September 8 and December 31.

Here are video excerpts from the event.

Jump into Climate Action In Hartford!

In December 2019 the Town of Hartford and the Hartford School District adopted the historic Joint Resolution Declaring a Climate Emergency, setting in motion an urgently needed positive first step to addressing climate change at the local level. Hartford’s Climate Advisory Committee (CAC) was formed to put the Resolution into action. Now, the time has come to once again engage the entire community in shaping the future of Hartford for the betterment of all residents.

Volunteers are needed to help the Town of Hartford create a Climate Action Plan. Working with paleBLUEdot, a climate action-planning consultancy, we must gather together to build a plan that ensures that Hartford thrives even as it works to mitigate the impacts of climate change on all and to adapt to the changing climate.

Creative solutions and a wide array of perspectives are essential to our success. Hartford residents, as well as residents of Lebanon, Hanover, Norwich and the surrounding area are all welcome. 

Representatives from local government, public agencies, local colleges/universities, the business community, environmental groups, social equity groups, and the general community are needed.

Eight general working groups are envisioned; individuals with experience or interest in any of these areas are encouraged to identify one or more areas of interest as part of their contribution to the planning team.

✔ transportation and land use

✔ waste management

✔ local food and agriculture

✔ energy and the built environment

✔ health and safety

✔ water, wastewater management, flood control

✔ greenspaces

✔ economic development and the climate economy

 

The Commitment:

Climate Action Team volunteers will participate in four workshops over the course of several months to explore, review, prioritize, and refine elements of the Climate Action Plan. The expected time commitment is in the range of 20-30 hours.

Interested? Contact Hartford’s Climate Advisory Committee to sign up for the Climate Action Team.

Hartford’s Climate Advisory Committee

Erik Krauss (ekrauss@bluevertex.com)

Ana Mejia (ana@vitalcommunities.org)

Jack Spicer (jacktspicer@gmail.com)

Why Bank Locally?

Where You Bank Makes a Difference!

When you use a bank or credit union rooted in our community, you’re making a conscious choice to support our local economy. Local First Champion member Mascoma Bank is a great example of why it’s important to move your money to a local institution. Mascoma Bank has been committed to investing in and lending in our region since 1894. They prioritize supporting Upper Valley communities, small businesses, and entrepreneurs – keeping our economy and community vital!

5 Reasons to Move Your Money and Bank Locally

1. Get the Same Services at Lower Cost
Most locally owned banks and credit unions offer the same array of services, from online bill paying to debit and credit cards, at a much lower cost than big banks. Average fees at small banks and credit unions are substantially lower than at big banks, according to national data. Studies show that small financial institutions also offer, on average, better interest rates on savings and better terms on credit cards and other loans.

2. Put Your Money to Work Growing Your Local Economy
Small businesses, which create the majority of new jobs, depend heavily on small, local banks for financing. Although small and mid-sized banks control less than one-quarter of all bank assets, they account for more than half of all small business lending. Big banks, meanwhile, allocate relatively little of their resources to small businesses. The largest 20 banks, which now control 57 percent of all bank assets, devote only 18 percent of their commercial loan portfolios to small business.

3. Keep Decision-Making Local
At local banks and credit unions, loan approvals and other key decisions are made locally by people who live in the community, have face-to-face relationships with their customers, and understand local needs. Because of this personal knowledge, local financial institutions are often able to approve small business and other loans that big banks would reject. In the case of credit unions, control ultimately rests with the customers, who are also member/owners.

4. Back Institutions that Share a Commitment to Your Community
The fortunes of local banks and credit unions are intimately tied to the fortunes of their local communities. The more the community prospers, the more the local bank benefits. This is why many local banks and credit unions are involved in their communities. Big banks, by contrast, are not tethered to the places where they operate. Indeed, they often use a community’s deposits to make investments in other regions or on Wall Street.

5. Support Productive Investment, Not Gambling
The primary activity of almost all small banks and credit unions is to turn deposits into loans and other productive investments. Meanwhile, big banks devote a sizeable share of their resources to speculative trading and other Wall Street bets that may generate big profits for the bank, but provide little economic or social value for the rest of us and can put the entirefinancial system at risk if they go bad.

Hartford Dollars Sell Out in Two Days!

Buyers gobbled up $18,000 worth of Hartford Dollars within just days of the new “currency” going on sale! And organizers hope it’s only the start of more and stronger trends and programs toward keeping dollars local.

Hartford Dollars give the bearer a 50 percent discount at more than 40 participating businesses throughout Hartford. Offered in $30 and $50 values sold for $15 and $25, respectively, they are a  COVID recovery project jointly coordinated by the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce, Vital Communities, the Town of Hartford, and Hartford Development Corporation and partially funded with federal funds through the State of Vermont. 

A total value of $18,000 Hartford dollars went on sale on Friday, October 16, and by end of Sunday had been purchased by approximately 200 people. Those buyers have until November 30 to use the dollars at any of the participating businesses. The dollars may not be used to purchase tobacco, cannabis, alcohol, lottery tickets, firearms, tax, or tips. No change will be given for Hartford Dollars. 

The program’s organizers hope to find funding to extend the program and perhaps help other communities launch similar programs, said Lori Hirschfield, director of planning and development for the Town of Hartford. “I know there are lots of people in the Upper Valley that want to support local businesses so keep doing that even if you don’t have local currency,” said Hirschfield.

We are thrilled at the response and already hearing lots of great stories about people using their Hartford Dollars,” she said. “We started this as novices, thinking it might take a week or so to get the word out.  The sell-out in less than 48 hours shows us how much this is needed and desired by consumers and businesses.”

At Vital Communities, the project is part of a network of initiatives aimed at encouraging Upper Valley residents to buy from locally owned businesses – a practice that contributes money to the local economy at a rate up to 4 times that of chains and online vendors, according to a recent study commissioned by Vital Communities.

“In addition to shining a light on Hartford businesses, we want to underscore the need for people to keep their dollars – Hartford Dollars and regular currency – in the Upper Valley, to support the businesses that we love and help them make it through the pandemic,” said Nancy LaRowe, manager of Vital Communities’ Vital Economy initiative. “They contribute to our unique downtowns, create stable jobs, give expert service, and give back to the community in many ways,  including generous donations of time, money, and products. And they have adapted in so many ways to help the community during the pandemic. This is a chance to help them hang in there.”

Many Upper Valley small businesses have been devastated by the economic disruption caused by the pandemic. Vital Communities, the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce, and other Hartford partners created the program to increase foot traffic and sales for struggling businesses, using a Restart Vermont Regional Marketing and Stimulus Grant from the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development. 

Hartford Dollars can be spent at any of these participating businesses: BE Fit Physical Therapy, Cloverleaf Jewelers, Deirdre Donnelly Jewelry Art, Dynamic Natural Athletes, Elixir Restaurant, Fat Hat Clothing Co, Flourish, Beauty Lab, Jake’s Market & Deli, JUEL Modern Apothecary, Little Istanbul. Living the Dream Alpaca Farm, Long River Gallery, Massage Eminence, Northern Stage, Open Door Integrative Wellness, Piecemeal Pies (shown above), Pizza Chef, POST., Public House at Quechee Gorge., Public House Diner Quechee, Raq-On Dance, LLC, Revolution, Scavenger gallery, Scout Hair Design, Small Batch Design Company, LLC, Stern’s Quality Produce, Steven Thomas, Inc., Strafford Saddlery, Sugarbush Farm, Sunrise Farm, The Collection, The Skinny Pancake – Quechee, The Uncommon Home LLC, Thyme, Trail Break taps + tacos, Tuckerbox, Upper Valley Aquatic Center, Upper Valley Yoga, Valley Flower Company, Vermont Institute of Natural Science, Wicked Awesome BBQ, and Wolf Tree.

 

Pivot, Perseverance & Passion: Business Recovery Forums

Many small businesses are overwhelmed with navigating the new normal while implementing rigid safety and sanitation protocols. Staying afloat during this challenging time and with ever-changing information requires the ability to pivot, have perseverance, and passion. Join Pandemic Small Business Navigator, Denise Anderson, and fellow business owners for weekly forums to get answers to questions and share challenges and information during this critical period as we re-open our economy.

Recordings and resources from the Spring series:

July 1, 2-3:30 pm: “Well-Being in the Workplace: Managing Stress & De-escalating Conflict”

Previous conversations in this series were intended for business owners but this one really targets a broader audience. “Workplace” has come to mean a different thing – our workplace may now be our kitchen or the garage. I even had a Zoom meeting with someone in a tree house! We now know all of our colleagues’ pets and children. In this context stress in the workplace translates more expansively than in the past and this session provides tools and information to recognize and address challenges as they arise in this new environment.
Can you find your HAPPY place, again? We are in the middle of a crisis and it is normal to experience emotional distress, but it is necessary to take care of ourselves, our families and our work. Everyone worries about the same things, but few of us talk about it or know what to do. Following an incident a few weeks ago, at an area Farmer’s Market, we at Vital Communities started talking about the fear and anxiety caused by this pandemic and the different ways we as individuals manifest stress. It impacts how we work and interact with others so it felt like an important topic to explore further – how to identify and respond to stress-induced behavioral challenges.
Join us to learn from local experts and explore tools and resources that support emotional and physical well-being for all of us – employers, employees, customers and clients.

Share your pre-forum questions with Denise at denise@vitalcommunities.org

We are making a video of this meeting to be shared later online. The video will show the Zoom boxes of those who speak and ask questions. If you wish to speak but not have your face appear, feel free to disable your camera. You may also watch the session online after it’s posted.

Previous forums:

May 27: Restaurant and hospitality Zoom audio recording (forum starts at 14 minutes into the recording)

Presenters-
Andrew Chevrefil, Andrew.Chevrefils@vermont.gov, Vermont Department of Health
Gordon Lodewyk, Gordon.Lodewyk@vermont.gov, Vermont Department of Health
Michael Hinsley, michael.hinsley@hanovernh.org, Hanover Health Officer

June 10: Restaurants #2 Zoom recording, Password: 9D#^R%Tk

Presenters
Andrew Chevrefil, Andrew.Chevrefils@vermont.gov, Vermont Department of Health
Gordon Lodewyk, Gordon.Lodewyk@vermont.gov, Vermont Department of Health
Michael Hinsley, michael.hinsley@hanovernh.org, Hanover Health Officer
Lori Hirshfield, Department of Planning and Development  – lhirshfield@hartford-vt.org
Brett Mayfield, Health Officer – health@hartford-vt.org
Scott Cooney, Fire Chief – scooney@hartford-vt.org
Mike Bedard, Fire Marshall – mbedard@hartford-vt.org

June 17: Eat, Celebrate, and Sleep Zoom recording, password 8Z*r*9+7

Presenters:
Nancy LaRowe, Vital Communities Local First – nancy@vitalcommunities.org
Amy Spears, Vermont Chamber of Commerce – aspear@vtchamber.com
Kiki Keating, KikiNetwork Global Connections – kiki@kikinetwork.com
Denise Anderson, Vital Communities Pandemic Small Business Navigator – denise@vitalcommunities.org

June 24: The OTHER Covid-19 Laws, recording, password 4L%8^994

 Presenters:

Denise Anderson, Pandemic Small Business Navigator at Vital Communities
Kim LaBarge, EA, Public Accountant – kim@labargeaccounting.com
Richard Paul, Jr., CPA – richardpaul@richardpaulcpa.com

 

July 1: Well-Being in the Workplace: Managing Stress & De-escalating Conflict recording, password 9U&8+97t

Following this session Vital Communities realized that some of the suggested actions offered by the Officer Santagate, taken out of context, could be considered inappropriate, insensative, or dangerous in the current system of white supremacy.
The de-escalation presentation was focused on conflicts involving enforcement of face covering and other public health protocols during the pandemic. Our invitation to law enforcement was intended to offer tips and techniques for businesses, by-standers, and the community to have the skills and confidence to de-escalate a situation without police intervention. Office Santagate clarified that the police should only be called when there is a real physical threat and not when someone “feels uncomfortable”, especially given the current racial tensions and that Hartford Police Department follows the state recommended Anit-Bias Policing polies.
Presenters:
M. Chase Levesque, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine
Melissa.C.Levesque.Folsom@Dartmouth.eduJessica Geiben Lynn, Sr. Organizational Effectiveness Consultant, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. Jessica.J.Geiben.Lynn@hitchcock.org 
Officer Cori Santagate, Hartford Police Department, Csantagate@hartford-vt.org

Wellbeing in the Workplace – Resources

GENERAL RESOURCES
National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
Crisis Text Line: Text 741741 from anywhere in the US to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.
Psychology Today Website – To find a specialized therapist, refer clients to the Psychology
Today website where they can enter filters to help them find a therapist who takes their insurance
and specializes in what they are looking for – both by diagnoses and approaches.

LOCAL RESOURCES

DHMC Psychiatric Emergencies: (800) 556-6249, press 7 (24 hours, 7 days a week)
UVCovidRelief.org
A group of volunteer licensed mental health counselors who are available for 30-minute
appointments to support residents of the Upper Valley who are affected in any way by the Covid-
19 pandemic. Individuals can take advantage of up to 6 sessions and can book the appointment
online through the website: uvcovidrelief.org.

NEW HAMPSHIRE COUNSELING AND SERVICES

West Central Behavioral Health
9 Hanover Street, Suite 2
Lebanon, NH 03756
Providing comprehensive mental and behavioral health treatment for adults ages 18+ and
seniors. Their clinical team develops a personalized plan of treatment designed to assist clints in
managing symptoms, improving health, and enhancing quality of life. They offer individualized
counsline sessions as well as psychiatric assessment, case management and emergency services.
GENERAL INQUIRES: (603) 448-0126
EMERGENCY SERVICES: (800) 564-2578

VERMONT COUNSELING AND SERVICES

HCRS
49 School Street,
Hartford, VT 05047
GENERAL INQUIRIES: 802-295-3031
CRISIS LINE: 800-622-4235
HCRS provides creative, collaborative and compassionate health care services that are
responsive to the needs of our community. They provide emergency services, individual
counseling, adult outpatient and substance abuse programs and more.

CLARA MARTIN CENTER
39 Fogg Farm Road
Wilder, VT
GENERAL INQUIRIES: (802) 295-1311
CRISIS LINE: 800-639-6360
Serving children, families and individuals coping with behavioral challenges, emotional stress,
mental illness, alcohol and other drug problems. They offer counseling, psychiatric services,
consultations, short term crisis intervention, education for families related to emotional and
behavioral challenges, evaluations, respite care, housing, assistance in obtaining disability
benefits, help with finding and keeping employment, outreach and home-based services, alcohol
and drug treatment, a walk-in clinic and a 24-hour emergency service system.

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