Berries: Delicious, versatile and in season now!

The Upper Valley berry season typically ranges from late June to early October. In our short, but fruitful season, we can enjoy raspberries and strawberries (although neither are technically real berries), then move into summer with black raspberries (aka black caps), currants, gooseberries, elderberries, blueberries, blackberries, and fall raspberries.

black raspberries to pick

At our place, at least one person exclaims “I ate more than I put in the bucket!”, a testimonial to the irresistible allure of the ripe, sun-sweetened fruits. With so many farms in the area cultivating these fruits and the luck of coming across wild or long-forgotten patches, harvesting enough berries for cooking and preserving isn’t usually too difficult to accomplish if you have the time and an empty container. Spending a morning at a pick your own farm is also a wonderful way to gather excess fruit for the winter, for those who can afford to do so. Fruit is also an allowable SNAP/3 Squares VT purchase, and most Upper Valley farmers markets will double SNAP dollars up to $10. That is, withdraw $10 of SNAP from your EBT card at the market tent, and the market will give you an additional $10 to spend on fruits and vegetables.

 Storing, washing, freezing and using berries is simple. Canning is another matter and your Extension website should have detailed information about safe canning methods.

 Storing and Washing Berries:

  1. Refrigerate right away. Chilling the berries for an hour or so before you wash them, helps keep these fragile, sun warmed fruits from falling apart under the water.
  2. Store on a shelf and NOT in the crisper or a drawer. Allowing air to circulate around the berries helps keep them fresher, longer.
  3. DO NOT rinse berries until you are ready to eat them.
  4. Rinse and drain in a colander. Do not soak or let them sit in water.

currants

Freezing Berries:

  1. Best Practice: Spread washed and dried berries on a cookie sheet lined with wax paper, in one layer, and freeze for several hours. Transfer frozen berries to a freezer-safe bag or container, removing air if possible, and keep frozen for several months.
  2. My Reality: Loosely pack into quart size freezer bags, remove air with a straw and seal tightly. Lay on side in freezer. Leave there for six months in the way back, under freezer-burned vanilla ice cream, before discovering during a frantic search for sugar one late night.

 

Tips for Use:

  • Eat fresh on everything.
  • Simmer a pint of berries, with sugar to taste, until the berries break down. Eat this sauce on everything.
  • Simmer a pint of berries, with sugar to taste, until the berries break down. Squeeze a bit of lemon or lime juice in there, strain out the solids and store in the refrigerator. Use this berry syrup in everything.
  • Use frozen berries in smoothies, pancakes, waffles, muffins, pie, cake, parfaits and fools.

Climate and Community Resilience: Lessons from the Soil

Climate and Community Resilience: Lessons from the Soil
Spring Community Webinar Series to Unpack What Creating Our Future Looks Like

What is good for the soil is good for our communities. Deep healthy soil governs flood resilience, clean water, strong local economies, and a myriad of ecological functions. Lessons from the soil–such as interdependence, biodiversity, and resource cycling–can help us to understand the past and create the future for the Upper Valley. In these times of great ecological, social,  and economic transformation, this series of six programs will unpack the science of whole systems landscape function, explore how land and society change together, and offer practical ways to engage with the land around you for community resilience and social justice. This series aims to expand the base of active “doers” who work together to build a more livable, resilient region and planet.

Find detailed information about content at Vermont Healthy Soils Coalition!

FREE and open to all. Registration encouraged.

REGISTER HERE

As a precaution to limit the spread of the Coronavirus and to safeguard the health and well-being of everyone, the series will be modified to a webinar format.

Strengthening community and providing space for people to connect and learn together has suddenly become a more urgent need. We need each other now more than ever. To increase accessibility and safety we will plan to host the entire series in webinar format using Zoom. When it becomes safe again to commune together publicly we will switch back to in-person gatherings. We will keep everyone informed to changes as the uncertain future unfolds. Please register to receive updates.

The Zoom web browser client will download automatically when anyone joins their first Zoom meeting. It is also available for manual download here: https://zoom.us/download

Earth’s Cycles: Foundations of Energy and Matter
Sunday, March 22, 3:30-6 pm

Framing the entire series, this event introduces cycles of energy and matter that create a livable planet. The soil health principles provide a lens to understand how systems work together and to identify points of intervention where changes have been – and can be – made to influence climate and ecology. 

Click here March 22 at 3:15 or after to join this webinar.


Historical Landscape: Learning from the Past
Sunday, April 5, 3:30-6 pm

Take a deep dive into the history of the Upper Valley to understand its watersheds, landscapes, climates, and inhabitants – and how they affect each other. Use the lessons of the past to envision a just future. 

Click here April 5 at 3:15 or after to join this webinar.


Here and Now: Human Impacts
Monday, April 13, 5:30-8 pm

The world today has been shaped by human decisions to rearrange Earth’s systems. Learn about how and why the world exists in its current unstable state and explore possibilities to make better decisions in the future.

Click here April 13 at 5:15 or after to join this webinar.


Systems Collapse: Climate and Ecological Crisis
Sunday, April 26, 3:30-6 pm

The environment is destabilizing, along with societies, economies, and cultures. Understand the collapse through various lenses to explore adaptation and avoid false solutions. 

Click here April 26 at 3:15 or after to joim this webinar.


Revolutionary Resilience: Creating a Different Future
Monday, May 4, 5:30-8 pm

With the understanding of the impacts of human decisions for the planet, explore the intersections of justice, land, and life. Work together to envision and create “what could be” in terms of a just future in the Upper Valley and beyond.

Click here May 4 at 5:15 or after to join this webinar.


Fertile Ground: Reclaiming Power and Possibility
TBD

This culminating event will bring us together on a local farm to reflect on the power of natural systems and community collaboration. Through discussion, activities and sharing with a team of change-makers and organizations from the region, explore what already exists and help realize next steps for the Upper Valley.

What is good for the soil is good for our communities. Deep healthy soil governs flood resilience, clean water, strong local economies, and a myriad of ecological functions. Lessons from the soil–such as interdependence, biodiversity, and resource cycling–can help us to understand the past and create the future for the Upper Valley. In these times of great ecological, social,  and economic transformation, this series of six programs will unpack the science of whole systems landscape function, explore how land and society change together, and offer practical ways to engage with the land around you for community resilience and social justice. 

This series will introduce the functions of Earth’s energy, water, carbon, and nutrient cycles. It will center lived experiences, sometimes difficult truths, and social and economic justice. Attendees will collaborate with various presenters and facilitators to explore information about the land and inhabitants in the Upper Valley at different periods throughout time – the past, present, and future. 

The format encourages an approach of thinking in whole systems rather than parts, of listening over speaking, of curiosity over knowing, and of participatory learning. A desired outcome is that people will take new ideas, new understandings, new questions, and new energies forward into the community to create positive change. This series aims to expand the base of active “doers” who work together toward a more livable, resilient region and planet.

 

Learn more at Vermont Healthy Soils Coalition!

Renewable Energy Funding for Farms and Small Businesses

Get the information you need to move forward with a renewable energy or energy efficiency project in Vermont or New Hampshire. Join Ken Yearman, Rural Development Energy Coordinator for Vermont and New Hampshire; a farmer who recently completed a REAP project; the solar company that completed that project; and Ana Mejia, Vital Communities Climate Projects Coordinator. Our workshop will be held in the Hanover Co-op Food Stores’ Co-op Learning Center which is inside the Co-op’s LEBANON location at 12 Centerra Parkway. Lunch included! Get all your questions answered and take action on your renewable energy or efficiency projects!

Join Vital Communities, Hanover Co-op Food Stores, and USDA Rural Development for a webinar and workshop series to learn about opportunities to fund renewable energy systems and energy efficiency projects with the REAP (Renewable Energy for America Program).

Attend both events or just one and learn how to use government grants and loans to reduce your energy cost and your carbon footprint.

  • Webinar: February 19, 11:30 am-12:30 pm. Get an overview of REAP grant and loan programs with Fred Petok and Ken Yearman from USDA Rural Development.
    View webinar presentation here
  • Workshop: February 24,  11:30 am-1:30 pm. Get the information you need to move forward with a renewable energy or energy efficiency project in Vermont or New Hampshire. Join Ken Yearman, Rural Development Energy Coordinator for Vermont and New Hampshire; a farmer who recently completed a REAP project; the solar company that completed that project; and Ana Mejia, Vital Communities Climate Projects Coordinator. Our workshop will be held in the Hanover Co-op Food Stores’ Co-op Learning Center which is inside the Co-op’s LEBANON location at 12 Centerra Parkway. Lunch included! Get all your questions answered and take action on your renewable energy or efficiency projects!  Workshop registration.

    This workshop is part of Vital Communities’ Farmer Climate Network. We can provide stipends to compensate Upper Valley farmers for their time to attend this workshop thanks to the Hanover Cooperative Community Fund. Contact nancy@vitalcommunities.org for details.

From the State House to the Farm House

Calling all Vermont Farmers!

You’re invited to the second annual From the State House to the Farmhouse event on

Sunday September 22nd from 1-4 pm

and talk one-on-one with your legislators and influence policy.

Across the state legislators are invited to tour 14 host farms to celebrate the innovation and dedication of Vermont farmers while hearing directly from you about the challenges you face and the opportunities you are excited about. We hope the day is for sharing and listening as we work together to support a thriving ag economy and maintain a bright future for farming in Vermont!

RSVPs really appreciated: nancy@vitalcommunities.org

 

Two Upper Valley farms are hosting events on September 22: Richardson Farm in Hartland and Howling Wolf Farm in Randolph. Take advantage of this opportunity to join other farmers and talk with your state legislators and let your voice be heard.

This is a private event only open to farmers and legislators. Please RSVP to nancy@vitalcommunities.org  so the host farm can prepare.

Food Hub Forum for Farmers February 6!

Join Vital Communities and Food Connects
Wednesday February 6 from 4-6 pm
at Piecemeal Pie in White River Junction
for a forum to learn about how you can
expand your market access with a food hub.
This forum is free and open to all farmers and growers
and will include delicious snacks and beer.

Food Connects, a Brattleboro-based nonprofit food hub, is expanding into the Upper Valley in 2019 and is now seeking Upper Valley producer partners who want to be part of this growth. We are thrilled about this expansion and looking forward to sharing the opportunities it can bring to Upper Valley farmers.  Paul Harlow of Harlow Farm will share his experience using Food Connects and you will learn the specifics about being a Food Connects producer.

There will be time to connect with each other and have all your questions about Food Connects answered, while enjoying amazing Piecemeal Pie food and drink.

RSVP (appreciated but not required to attend) and questions to Nancy LaRowe  (Nancy@VitalCommunities.org)

 

Vendor Mini-Grants for Flavors!

Vital Communities is pleased to announce mini-grants for 2019 Flavors of the Valley vendors!

These grants will help your farm, food business, or restaurant defray the costs of vending at Flavors of the Valley on April 7 at Hartford High School.

Any vendor that is a farm, food business, or restaurant that is eligible to vend at Flavors of the Valley is eligible to apply for funds. The maximum mini-grant award is $200.

Applicants must complete the simple on-line application form or print the (pdf) application form and return to Vital Communities. Applications received by February 17 will get first consideration, and thereafter applications will be considered on a rolling basis. Mini-grant applications will not be considered unless a complete vendor application and vendor fee has also been received.

Grant funds may be used to offset the cost of vendor registration, food sample costs, and/or the cost of staffing the event. A simple budget for use of the funds is required in the application.

We are excited to offer these mini-grants and welcome your questions. Please contact Beth Roy with any questions: Beth@VitalCommunities.org, 802.291.9100 x105.

Whole Farm Planning Group

Starting or running a farm business can be all-consuming, with tyranny of the urgent monopolizing your days, leaving little time to think about the big picture, review goals, or plan successful management strategies. Every farm is unique. With holistic management techniques, you can manage that uniqueness effectively to improve the health of your farm, your community, and the land.

I have been farming for almost 20 years. My experience includes starting and run a farm for 10 years, selling that business, and starting a new farm on newly purchased and conserved land.  This past year I have been practicing and utilizing the tools of holistic management, and it has  made such a difference in how I think about my new farm and how it integrates into my life. By having a values-based decision-making framework that considers social, economic, and environmental impacts, I can manage toward my goals and the farm and life I want.

I want to share this framework for success with prospective, new, or established farmers, which is why I am coordinating a Whole Farm Planning Group. The Group will be a cohort of five farms interested in learning and applying the tools of holistic management to their lives. We will meet four times a year (not during the growing season) to develop goals, share lessons and challenges, with most of the work being self-directed. I will share holistic management tools and support you as you develop your whole farm plan. You will work independently on developing a holistic goal, resource inventory, vision, land plan, and financial plan throughout the year. This project is free thanks to funding from the High Meadows Food & Farm Fund.

This “class” is great for beginning farmers as these management strategies will help you succeed. This work is also valuable if you already have a farm business and would like to learn new skills or strategies for improving your business. The sessions will begin this winter and continue into next winter. The five farms will be chosen with an application process. Applications are due by December 1.

Whole Farm Planning Group short application here.

2018 Farmer Celebration Mixer

Join us to celebrate the work we did together in 2018!

Do your chores early, leave the spreadsheets behind, and come share some beer, crepes, and farm chat with fellow farmers as we celebrate the successful 2018 season.

Monday, November 12
5-7 pm
Skinny Pancake, Hanover, NH
Free snacks and beer

In 2018, working together, we moved toward an Upper Valley food hub, we collaborated to strengthen farmers’ markets, we rocked the best Flavors of the Valley ever, and much more. Join in an end of season  celebration!!

Come learn about the shared farm/food facility progress we made with a SARE Partnership grant that is concluding, the wholesale aggregation and distribution pilot launching with Food Connects in 2019, and the Upper Valley Farmers’ Market Collaborative projects that we will be continuing in 2019. Come hear all about it and share your farms’ successes and challenges.

RSVP here!

Share the Facebook event with your farmer friends!

Questions? Nancy@VitalCommunities.org

 

Thanks to Northeast SARE and Skinny Pancake for supporting this event!

sare-northeast cropped    UVcreperieBanner-page-001

Farmers’ Market Roundtable

Join Vital Communities and NOFA VT for a

Farmers’ Market Roundtable

November 7, 2018 from 4-7 pm
at the Wilder Club & Library in Hartford, Vermont

The roundtable is an opportunity to network, share market successes and challenges, gain skills at break-out workshops, and build relationships with other markets in your area.

The Upper Valley Farmers’ Market Collaborative will convene to talk about POP Clubs, Friend of the Market card program, the cooking demo pilot projects, and plan for future projects.

September Market-Fresh Cooking Demos

Love to shop at the farmers’ market, and want to learn a new tip or recipe for cooking with all the great produce that is available this month?

Join local chef Holly Pierce for weekly cooking demos at the Hanover and Greater Falls Farmers’ Markets during the month of September!

Shop with Holly as she visits the market vendors to select ingredients from the bounty of local food available this time of year.  Then watch her create a dish that you get to sample. She’ll share the recipe as she goes and have other recipes to share that highlight enjoying the abundance of the Upper Valley late summer harvest!

Wednesdays at the Hanover Area Farmers’ Market from 3-6 pm
September 5, 12, 19, 26

Fridays in Bellows Falls at the Greater Falls Farmers’ Market from 3-7 pm
September 7, 14, 21, 28

  

1 2 3 9