The Topping On The Pizza

Thanks to the Domestic Diva for sharing her favorite pizza topping combinations with us!

Goat Cheese & Seasonal Greens Pizza

Seasoned oil

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
  • Salt, to taste

Topping

  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, kale or blistered tomatoes.
  • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 8 oz. whole-milk mozzarella cheese, coarsely grated
  • 4 oz. soft fresh goat cheese, crumbled (about 1 cup)

 

Pear, Cheese and Walnut Pizza

  • 12 oz. bleu or gorganzola cheese (manchego or brinata work well too)
  • 2 pears (about), halved, cored, very thinly sliced
  • 2/3 cup walnut pieces, coarsely broken
  • Freshly cracked black pepper
  • Extra-virgin olive oil

 

Pizza Margherita

2 cloves garlic- crushed into ¼ cup olive oil.  Drizzle on and spread olive oil over crust.  Reserve left over.

Cover with:

  • 1 lb fresh mozzarella, sliced thinly
  • 2  large tomatoes, sliced thinly
  • ½ bunch basil, chiffonade

Pesto For Your Pizza

Though marinara is fabulous on pizza, it’s not the only way to go.  Try a pesto base, and you won’t be disappointed.  Not familiar with pesto?  Pesto is to basil what chocolate is to cacao–a perfect combination to enhance a dynamic ingredient.  Though it may be a little late in the season to whip up a huge batch for your freezer, you can likely still find some good looking basil in smaller quantities at our local farmers’ market. Classic Pesto

This recipe makes a small batch perfect for a pizza.  Feel free to double, quadruple, etc. for larger batches for your freezer.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups basil leaves
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts (can be substituted with walnuts, though pine nuts are preferred)
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated
  • kosher salt, to taste

Instructions

Combine first 4 ingredients in blender. Blend until paste forms, stopping often to push down basil. Add both cheeses and salt; blend until smooth. Transfer to small bowl. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Top with 1/2 inch olive oil and chill.)

Three Basil Pesto

This recipe makes a batch large enough for a couple of pizzas and some leftovers.

Ingredients

  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/3 cup pine nuts (1/4 pound)
  • 1/2 cups grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
  • 1/2 cups grated Pecorino Romano
  • 1 cup packed Italian basil leaves
  • 1/2 cup packed bush basil leaves
  • 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh lemon basil leaves
  • 3/4 cups packed flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions

Pulse garlic in a food processor until finely chopped, then add nuts, cheeses, a large handful of herbs, and 1 teaspoon pepper and process until chopped. Add remaining herbs one handful at a time, pulsing after each addition, until finely chopped. With motor running, add oil and blend until incorporated.

Simple Marinara Sauce

After pizza dough, the next consideration for your pizza is the base.  Marinara sauce is the traditional way to go for a reason:  it’s simple, versatile, and tastes great.  As the Domestic Diva points out, you can make a big batch of this and freeze leftovers for future pizza or pasta dinners. Thanks Diva, for sharing this great recipe with us! Marinara Sauce

Ingredients

 

  • 1 lg onion, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, chopped finely
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1-1 ½ cups red wine (can be replaced by vegetable or meat broth)
  • 3 ½ pounds of fresh or previously frozen tomatoes. Cut into chunks reserving juices and using additional tomato juice if needed, OR 2 cans of whole or diced tomatoes
  • ½ lg bunch of basil
  • 2 sprigs of thyme
  • 2 sprigs of oregano
  • 1 lg pinch kosher salt
  • 1 lg pinch sugar
  • 3-6 tbsp olive oil (to taste)

Directions

Sautè onions in vegetable oil until translucent.  Add garlic, cook until fragrant.

Deglaze with wine.  (What is deglazing?) Add tomatoes, herbs, salt and sugar.  Cook until the mixture simmers.  Add olive oil, to taste.  Puree with blender, immersion blender, magic bullet or food processor.

This is a large batch of sauce, so there will be plenty left over for freezing! Just place in large zip lock bag and place in freezer placed flat on its side.

Simple Pizza Dough

Let’s start at the bottom and work up.  Here’s the Diva’s recommended recipe for pizza dough–it’s my personal favorite too!  I’ve included directions for making dough by hand and making dough using a stand mixer with a dough hook.

Note:  Dough can be made up to one day ahead and stored in an air-tight container in the refrigerator.  

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup warm water (105°F to 115°F)
  • 1 envelope active dry yeast
  • 2 cups (or more) all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon honey (or sugar)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

By Hand

Proof (proofing is just testing to make sure it’s still alive–if it doesn’t bubble in the warm water, it’s no longer good) yeast by adding packet of yeast to ½ cup warm water.  It will bubble and appear frothy.

Place half of the flour, honey, salt and olive oil in a large bowl.

Add yeast mixture and stir with a wooden spoon until the flour is moist.  Add remaining flour gradually, and stir after each addition.  You MAY need to add additional water if the dough is too dry. (You can tell it’s too dry if it doesn’t stick together.)

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface, and knead for 5 to 7 minutes, adding extra flour if needed to make dough pliant.  The dough should be relatively smooth and elastic.

Place dough in bowl coated with olive oil. Roll and coat with oil. Cover with a moist towel and place in a warm spot for one hour (or, until the dough doubles in volume).

Punch (punch means use your fist to deflate the dough, starting in the center and then working around the sides of the ball) dough down, and roll onto the floured work surface.

Can be made 1 day ahead. Store in airtight container in refrigerator.

Form dough into one large, two medium, or three small (personal pizza size) balls.

Pick it up and begin rotating it through your hands, pulling from the center of the dough out.

When dough becomes relaxed, place on work surface and using rolling pin to roll out the crust. Thinner crust makes a crispier pizza; thicker crust is chewier.

With a Stand Mixer

Measure the flour and the salt into the bowl of a stand mixer. Combine on very low speed with the paddle attachment.

Slowly add the liquid ingredients to the dry, and increase the speed of the mixer slightly to incorporate the mass.

Stop the mixer and replace the paddle with a dough hook if you have one. Knead with dough hook until the dough becomes smooth and begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl, about 4 minutes.

Place the dough on a floured board and knead the doughby hand for another 1 to 2 minutes. Add flour to dust as needed to prevent sticking.

Shape the dough into a ball and place in a very lightly oiled bowl and cover with a clean towel, let stand until dough doubles in size, about 1 hour.

Punch (punch means use your fist to deflate the dough, starting in the center and then working around the sides of the ball) dough down, and roll onto the floured work surface.

Can be made 1 day ahead. Store in airtight container in refrigerator.

Form dough into one large, two medium, or three small (personal pizza size) balls.

Begin rotating it through your hands, pulling from the center of the dough out.

When dough becomes relaxed, place on work surface and using rolling pin to roll out the crust. Thinner crust makes a crispier pizza; thicker crust is chewier.

Buttermilk Basil Dressing

Thanks to the Domestic Diva for sharing this amazing dressing with us!

Ingredients

  • 1 garlic clove, chopped finely
  • 2/3 cup buttermilk
  • 1/3 sour cream
  • 2+ tbsp finely chopped basil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Combine using any of the following options:

  • Super simple (for small quantities):  put all ingredients in a mug, and agitate in a circular motion with a fork.
  • Still pretty simple: put all ingredients in a glass jar with a lid (like a canning jar), tighten the lid, and shake like the dickens–fun job for kiddos.
  • Simple:  put all ingredients in a medium bowl and whisk vigorously.
  • Not-so-simple, but still fun (good for larger quantities):  Pull out your food processor or (the Diva’s favorite) Magic Bullet, add solid ingredients first (like garlic or ginger) and pulse until everything is minced.  Then all other non-oil ingredients (vinegar, maple syrup, tamari, etc), and then, while the processor is still on, add the oil slowly.  Voila.  You’ll have a tasty and emulsified dressing.

If you’re making a big batch, leftovers can be kept in a sealed jar in your refrigerator for up to five days.

Maple-Balsamic Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons whole-grain mustard
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper, to taste

Directions

Combine using any of the following options:

  • Super simple (for small quantities):  put all ingredients in a mug, and agitate in a circular motion with a fork.
  • Still pretty simple: put all ingredients in a glass jar with a lid (like a canning jar), tighten the lid, and shake like the dickens–fun job for kiddos.
  • Simple:  put all ingredients in a medium bowl and whisk vigorously.
  • Not-so-simple, but still fun (good for larger quantities):  Pull out your food processor or (the Diva’s favorite) Magic Bullet, add solid ingredients first (like garlic or ginger) and pulse until everything is minced.  Then all other non-oil ingredients (vinegar, maple syrup, tamari, etc), and then, while the processor is still on, add the oil slowly.  Voila.  You’ll have a tasty and emulsified dressing.

If you’re making a big batch, leftovers can be kept in a sealed jar in your refrigerator for up to five days.

Homemade Dressing: How?

So you’re convinced that making your own homemade dressing is at least worth a shot. Here’s the how-to that will help you to take this theory and put it into practice. Where to start? Unless you’re already well-acquainted with different oils and vinegars, it is helpful to start with a recipe.  Check out our Maple Balsamic Vinaigrette and the Domestic Diva’s Buttermilk Basil Dressing, and then check out the considerations for combining below.

5 Basic Elements of salad dressing for Everyday Chef.

  1. Oil:  Use a good quality olive oil or neutral-tasting alternative like canola, grapeseed or safflower. Combined with a bit of sesame oil or nut oil, you’ve got an dressing you won’t find in the store.  How much oil do you need? Traditionally, the oil to acid ratio is 3 to 1, but I prefer an equal 1 to 1 mix.
  2. Acid: The go-to vinegars are balsamic, red wine and rice vinegar. Want a change of pace? Try champagne or sherry vinegar.  You can also substitute some or all of the vinegar with freshly squeezed lemon juice. A splash of lime juice goes well with citrus-based salads.
  3. Sweet: To take the edge off the acid, add a touch of sweetness. Ordinary white sugar will do, but you’ll add more flavour with honey, maple syrup, apple juice, or even jam.
  4. Salt: A generous pinch or two is usually enough.  If you’re desired dressing is Asian-inspired, opt for Tamari (a slightly more refined soy sauce) instead of salt.  The Domestic Diva recommends kosher salt and sea salt.
  5. Aromatics: Minced fresh herbs, shallots, citrus rind, black pepper and/or garlic aren’t mandatory but add flavor. Common salad herbs include basil, thyme, tarragon, cilantro, mint, parsley and dill. Mix and match as you please.

How to combine it all?

You have several great options for combining your dressing accommodates any kitchen set-up or budget.  The following list details options from simple to complex:

  • Super simple (for small quantities):  put all ingredients in a mug, and agitate in a circular motion with a fork.
  • Still pretty simple: put all ingredients in a glass jar with a lid (like a canning jar), tighten the lid, and shake like the dickens–fun job for kiddos.
  • Simple:  put all ingredients in a medium bowl and whisk vigorously.
  • Not-so-simple, but still fun (good for larger quantities):  Pull out your food processor or (the Diva’s favorite) Magic Bullet, add solid ingredients first (like garlic or ginger) and pulse until everything is minced.  Then all other non-oil ingredients (vinegar, maple syrup, tamari, etc), and then, while the processor is still on, add the oil slowly.  Voila.  You’ll have a tasty and emulsified dressing.

If you’re making a big batch, leftovers can be kept in a sealed jar in your refrigerator for up to five days.

Garlic Scape Pesto

Ingredients:

  • One bunch garlic scapes (approximately 10), chopped
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup finely grated parmesan cheese
  • 1/3 cup walnuts or almonds (can be toasted if desired)
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt, to taste

Preparation: Put the scapes, cheese, nuts, and olive oil in a food processor or blender (can be done with a mortar and pestle as well–just more elbow grease required) and whir until ingredients are evenly blended.  More olive oil can be added to thin if it is too thick for your taste.  Add salt to taste and whir again briefly.

Use pesto immediately as a sauce for warm pasta, or to spread on fresh bread or veggies.  Pesto is easy to freeze in plastic bags or containers.  Otherwise, store in the fridge for a couple of days with a bit of plastic over the surface to prevent oxidizing.

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