Tomato & Caramelized Onion Tart

After a green bean canning fiasco earlier this summer I said I was done with canning for the year. But then the cooler weather came, along with a great deal on bulk tomatoes, and it didn’t take long for me to change my mind. So this past weekend I not only canned a few dozen pounds of crushed tomatoes, but also slow roasted and dried some as well.

There are simpler ways to preserve tomatoes, though, such as freezing them whole and not having to go through the hassle of peeling and blanching. The same goes for peppers, too. Check out Radical Roots’ website for great tips on freezing. But until I get myself a chest freezer, that’s not the best option for me, as I can barely shut the freezer door as is.

But you could also just enjoy tomatoes now. It’s getting cold out, but a warm, flaky tart right out of the oven is a nice way to transition tomatoes into fall. If you have some heirloom tomatoes, they’ll make things especially attractive.

crust

You can use your favorite pie crust recipe or find a quality one from the store. If you’re making your own, all you need to remember is the ratio 3-2-1. A basic crust is made from 3 parts flour, 2 parts butter and 1 part water. Add a little salt and/or sugar for flavor.

Cover the dough with Dijon mustard (a nice idea from David Lebovitz), top with a layer of sweet caramelized onions, plenty of cheese, then tomatoes and chopped fresh herbs. A drizzle of honey and balsamic vinegar add a nice touch to top it off.

Caramelized onions make everything better, so make sure to cook them long enough to get some good color – at least 20 minutes, but up to 45 minutes to an hour.

Crumble over the cheese – I like a sharp aged cheddar, but use what you like – Parmesan or goat would work well.

tomato

Then the tomatoes, herbs, honey and balsamic. Just pop it in the oven at 425 for about 30 minutes, or until the crust is crispy, the tomatoes tender and cheese melted. Serve along with a green salad.

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 4-6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 onions
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 12 ounces pie dough (your favorite recipe, or store bought)
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 6 ounces cheddar cheese, sliced or chopped
  • 3 large ripe tomatoes, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs, such as thyme, basil or chives
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. Slice the onions. Add to a medium pot with the olive oil set over medium-high heat. Cover and let cook about 25-45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Onions should be golden and sweet.
  3. Line a half sheet pan (18×13”) with parchment paper. Roll the dough out over top to fit the pan.
  4. Spread the mustard over the dough, then spread over the caramelized onions, the cheese, then tomatoes. Sprinkle over the herbs, balsamic vinegar and honey, if using.
  5. Bake 25-30 minutes until the dough is cooked and tomatoes tender.

Sweet Pepper Bake

I’m always amazed at the end of season productivity of pepper plants and their vibrant hues as they reach peak ripeness.

Yet I’m not quite sure what we do with these beauties to highlight their greatness. Sure, stuffed peppers are delicious. But is that all we have in our repertoire to place peppers in the spotlight?

pot of peppers

Not any more. This sweet pepper bake is all about the peppers. It’s a creamy, tangy casserole chock full of tender bell peppers, onions and garlic baked in a  yogurt based custard to hold it all together. The result is a terrific filling for warm tortillas.

casserole

Sweet Pepper Bake

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 6 medium bell peppers, seeded and thinly sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded and chopped (optional)
  • 1/2 cup dried currants
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed coriander seed
  • 2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups yogurt
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1 cup grated cheddar cheese, plus more for topping
  • a handful of chopped, fresh parsley
  • 1 large tomato, chopped (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large oven proof skillet or Dutch oven. Add the onions and saute over medium heat until softened, about 8 minutes.
  3. Add the peppers, garlic, jalapeno, currants, salt, cumin, coriander, mustard and black pepper. Cook another 12-15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the peppers are tender. Meanwhile, beat the eggs into the yogurt in a small bowl.
  4. When the peppers are tender, remove from the heat and stir in the yogurt mixture. Top with the cheese and place the pan in the oven to bake for 25-30 minutes until the mixture has thickened and is bubbly. Top with parsley.
  5. Serve in warmed tortillas, topped with additional cheese, chopped tomato and a side of black beans.

Notes

Adapted from The New Moosewood Cookbook

Beef, Turkey & Mushroom Meatloaf with Cider Mustard Gravy

I grew up eating meatloaf on a regular basis. It was a popular item in my mom’s dinner rotation, usually served with baked potatoes – because they could bake at the same time – and a green vegetable, like broccoli. Although I’ve knocked my mom’s cooking on occasion (sorry, mom) I actually liked her meatloaf quite a bit. And the leftovers made for a good sandwich on toasted bread with cheese and ketchup.

But not everyone has happy memories of meatloaf and there’s that association with bad cafeteria food. Just the sound of it is perceived as a bit unappetizing. A loaf of meat? Surely someone could have thought of a better name. Though isn’t it strange how no one reacts that way to meatballs, especially when a meatloaf and a meatball are so similar? Hmm.

Traditional meatloaf “mix” is packaged with beef and pork. But as I browsed around the Rutland Co-op last week, turkey caught my eye over pork.  I guess my turkey craving couldn’t wait for Thanksgiving. Mushrooms called to me as well and add an extra savory depth to the loaf. And that’s what I love about foods like meatloaf, meatballs and burgers – you can always play with the flavors.

Chopped onion, garlic, sage and thyme flavor the meat as well, while egg and breadcrumbs bind it all together. It’s really pretty simple to put together, that must have been why my mom relied on it so often. Once the meat is mixed it bakes unattended for nearly an hour.

meatloaf ingredients

The best tool for mixing meat is your hands. Don’t be afraid to get a little dirty.

You don’t need a loaf pan for a meatloaf. It bakes up fine just shaped on a baking sheet. See the large flecks of onion? Yum. But if you’re not an onion fan, chop those up a bit more than I did here.

cider gravy
A little homemade gravy cannot be overlooked when serving meatloaf.  Just save some of the onion from the loaf, cook it with tomato paste, mustard and flour, reduce with apple cider and it’s good to go well before the meatloaf comes out of the oven. Or if you’re on top of your game and have the gravy made before the meatloaf is in the oven, spoon some over top before baking.

meatloaf

Beef, Turkey & Mushroom Meatloaf with Cider Mustard Gravy

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 6-8 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 cup bread crumbs (or 1 large slice of bread, chopped)
  • 2 cups broth (beef, turkey or vegetable)
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 1/2 cup mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 10 leaves sage, chopped
  • 8 sprigs thyme, leaves removed
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • salt and pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup apple cider
  • A small bunch fresh parsley, roughly chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. In a small bowl, pour one cup of the broth over the breadcrumbs and let sit for a minute as you prepare the other ingredients.
  3. Combine the beef, turkey, mushrooms, half of the chopped onion, garlic, herbs and egg in a large bowl. Mix together with your hands and fold in the breadcrumbs. Season well with salt and pepper.
  4. Form the meat mixture into one large loaf or two smaller loaves on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil.
  5. Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, depending on the size of your loaf.
  6. Meanwhile, in a small pot cook the onion, tomato paste and mustard in a tablespoon of the oil. When onions have softened, about 5 minutes, sprinkle over the flour. Cook another minute, then add the remaining cup of broth and the cider. Simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes, then add in the parsley.
  7. Slice the meatloaf and serve with the gravy.

Maple Trees + Spring = Liquid Gold

Maple syrup. Ubiquitous and delightful. Celebrated and loved. The sweet liquid gold of our green mountains.

Vermont is well known for its sugar houses that dot our working landscape, belching steam from its vents and smoke from its stacks.
Our season is short and completely dependent on the weather – freezing nights, ‘warmer than freezing’ days – and a sugarmaker can be found in the sugar house for days on end as long as the sap is running.
treebucket_UOFCabotMaple syrup, like honey, is rich in antioxidants and minerals from the trees it comes from. It is a great substitute in recipes that call for honey or simple syrup and can often be successfully swapped in for  cane sugar.

In our house, besides the usual pancakes and waffles, we drizzle maple syrup over bananas slathered with peanut butter or use it to sweeten our tea. It is a delicious on oatmeal, in a smoothie, in a salad dressing and spooned over plain yogurt or even ice cream.

Maple syrup recipes abound, so rather than give you lots of new ones, see below for some great recipes within Everyday Chef as well as a few other exceptional sources.

So the only question now is…golden, amber or dark?

carrots

RECIPES, FACTS, & HOW TO:

Links below will open up a new window

Everyday Chef: Our Favorite Recipes using Maple Syrup

VPR Cafe: Exploring Vermont Maple Syrup Recipes Through the Ages

Buzzfeed:  57 Magical Ways to use Maple Syrup

Vermont Maple: How We Make It

Tablespoon: How to Sweeten with Maple Syrup

Cornell University: Replacing Table Sugar with Maple Syrup (pdf)

Roasted Pumpkin Stuffed with Many Good Things

Stuffed Pumpkin

Roasted Pumpkin Stuffed with Many Good Things

Serves approximately 2 as a main dish or 4 as a side dish. Can double the recipe for a larger crowd!

Ingredients:

1 small pumpkin, about 3lbs

Salt and ground black pepper

1 ½ cups bulghur or brown rice, cooked

1 ½ cups chopped apples

¼ cup sharp cheddar

1 clove garlic, minced

1 small onion, diced

1 tsp each dried rosemary and parsley (or 1 T each of fresh, chopped)

pinch of cayenne pepper (optional)

4 T shredded parmesan, divided into two parts

⅓ cup of vegetable stock or milk

Directions:

Center the rack in an oven and preheat to 350 degrees F. Line a baking dish large enough to hold the pumpkin(s) with parchment paper. Keep in mind that you may need a bit more room to maneuver a spatula in case you want to serve the pumpkin on a different dish.

With a sharp and sturdy knife, carefully cut the top ¼ or ⅓ off from your pumpkin, like you are making a jack-o-lantern. Set aside the top. Scoop out the seeds and pulp, leaving a cavity that can be filled. Season the inside of the pumpkin with salt and pepper.

In a large bowl, toss together the next 8 ingredients, setting aside 2 T of parmesan. Pour half of the measured liquid on the mixture and toss to coat. Add more liquid as needed so that the stuffing is moist, but not swimming.

Spoon the stuffing into the pumpkin until filled to the top. Any leftover stuffing can be baked separately in a dish. Set the pumpkin in the parchment lined dish and sprinkle the remaining parmesan on top of the stuffing. Put the pumpkin top on and bake until the pumpkin is tender, about 2 hours. About 20 to 30 minutes before it is done, remove the pumpkin top so the stuffing can brown.

You can serve the pumpkin straight from the baking dish or for a more elegant presentation, using a steady hand and a sturdy spatula, transfer the whole pumpkin to a serving dish. Cut into wedges and serve!

Notes: Pumpkin seeds can be cleaned and roasted with a little olive oil. All the vegetable bits, including the pumpkin pulp, can be added to a pot with water, brought to a simmer for several minutes and strained for a delicious vegetable stock.

Cooking Variations:

  • Almost any winter squash can be used in place of the pumpkin, with roasting times varying. Smaller or elongated squashes (like delicata or butternut), can be sliced in half and the cavities filled.
  • Think of this recipe as a guideline and try variations. For example, in place of the bulghur or rice, try pieces of whole grain stale bread. Or dried cranberries or apricots for the apples. Try pairing sage with chevre or mix in feta, mozzarella and swiss. This stuffing also pairs well with cooked sausage or bacon if you would like to add meat and nuts are delicious for additional protein and healthy fats.

Apple and Onion Stuffing

Photo Courtesy of www.FarmFreshFeasts.com

Photo Courtesy of www.FarmFreshFeasts.com

Apple and Onion Stuffing

Makes 10-12 servings

1 stick unsalted butter
4 ribs celery, chopped or 1 large celery root
1 large onion, chopped
2 large apples, peeled and chopped
2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary, thyme and sage or poultry seasoning
About 12 cups stale bread, cubed
3 cups broth
½ cup dried cranberries
2 eggs, beaten
½ cup fresh parsley, chopped

Melt the butter in a large pan. Add the celery, onion, apple, a pinch of salt and herbs or poultry seasoning. Cook about 5 minutes, until veggies have softened. Pour in broth and toss in the bread and cranberries. Cook another 5 minutes then stir in the egg and parsley. Divide among lightly oiled muffin tins. If preparing ahead of time, cover and refrigerate until ready to bake. When ready, bake covered with foil, for 20 minutes in a 375F preheated oven then another 20 minutes uncovered. They’re done when browned and crispy.

The Ultimate Onion Tart

Man-buying-onions-from-Steve-Fulton-Blue-Ox-Farm-FOV09-vff-camera-085-300x225
The Ultimate Onion Tart
By Laila Gohar
Servings: 6
Ingredients
  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 2 pounds yellow onions, sliced into rings
  • 2 springs fresh thyme
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup half and half
  • 5 strips bacon, diced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375F. Melt the butter and oil together in a large skillet and add the diced bacon. Cook until the bacon is halfway cooked.

  1. Add the thyme, onion and salt to the skillet. Cook on medium-low heat until the onions are completely translucent and caramelized. This will take around 30 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.
  2. Combine 2 eggs and the half and half in a bowl. Add the caramelized onion mixture and the freshly ground black pepper.
  3. Roll out the puff pastry in a buttered pie or glass dish. (Make sure the pastry has four edges in order to hold the onion mixture.)
  4. Add the mixture to the pastry and bake for 35 minutes or until the crust and top are slightly browned.
  5. Allow to cool, then slice and serve.

Spring Freezer Cleanout: Turkey Pot Pie

how-long-food-last

Earlier this week I joined Bethany Yon from the VT Department of Health on her show, What’s Cooking Rutland. The theme was cleaning out the freezer. Bethany and I took inventory of our freezers and were surprised by how much we found – especially in leftover fruits and vegetables from last year’s harvest.

Now is a good time to see what is hanging out in there and to start using up what you already have before the season really kicks off and you start buying more. It’s not a bad idea to clear out anything questionable either. Here’s a useful guide to reference while determining what may or may not be worth saving.

Fruits and vegetables, for instance, shouldn’t spend more than a year in your freezer.

We based the show’s menu around what we found. When I discovered green beans, kale, carrots, homemade chicken stock, herbs, and pie crust, a pot pie came to mind. Then Bethany told me she had turkey breast from Thanksgiving. Perfect.

I took the items out of the freezer earlier in the day to defrost and lightly pressed out some of the water that was left in some of the vegetables. While you could try making this without defrosting the vegetables (the meat, on the other hand, will definitely require a defrost period), you might end up with a pretty watery pie. It’s harder to drain out the excess liquid at that point.

While I worked on the pie, Bethany made the blueberry and maple syrup sorbet we posted last year and a refreshing strawberry rhubarb soup. I usually don’t like rhubarb, but that was good stuff.

The show will be airing all through April on PEG-TV and streaming on their site as well. Check it out. Here’s the recipe for the pot pie. Of course, you could use ingredients that haven’t been frozen as well.

Turkey Pot Pie

  • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 Tbsp. butter
  • 3 Tbsp. flour
  • 3 cups stock
  • 2 1/2 cups cooked, cubed turkey (or chicken)
  • 3 cups mixed vegetables
  • 2-3 Tbsp. of your favorite herbs (such as thyme, rosemary, parsley, oregano), chopped
  • 1 or 2 sheets of pie crust, either homemade or store bought
  • 1 egg, beaten

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Melt the butter in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onion and garlic and saute for a few minutes, until translucent. Stir in the flour and let cook for a minute, while moving around the pan, before pouring in the stock. Bring to a simmer for a couple of minutes and then add the meat, vegetables, and herbs. Simmer for 5 minutes until everything is heated through and the sauce has thickened. Taste and adjust seasoning, if needed.

If you’d like both a bottom and top crust to your pie, go ahead and spread one sheet of dough over the bottom of a pie plate. A casserole dish could work too, if desired. Ladle in the contents of the pan and then top with another sheet of dough. Crimp the edges of the dough if you’re looking to have a nice presentation, or if you’re too eager to bother, just make a few slits with a knife. Brush with the beaten egg, for a browner, crispier crust, place on a baking sheet, and slide into the oven.

Bake for about 45 minutes, until the crust is looking golden brown. Remove and let cool as long as you can before slicing up and digging in.

Whole Wheat Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies

It often seems that the many fruits and vegetables of Vermont overshadow the other foods produced here. Take grains, for instance. Did you even know you can find them locally? Gleason Grains of Bridport and Nitty Gritty Grains of Charlotte are two (but not the only) grain producers in Vermont worth checking out. In Rutland, you can find several of their flours and grains for sale in the bulk section of the Rutland Area Food Co-op at very reasonable prices.

Outmeal Cookie

While we have talked a little about cooking with grains, we have yet to get into flour. Perhaps it’s because we don’t often cover baking. Yet it’s an equally important knowledge base for the Everyday Chef. And I’m not just saying that because I’m a freelance baker. Knowing how to make one’s own baked goods – whether it be breads, cakes, muffins, or cookies – is much better for your health and is more economical. Whether we admit it or not, most of us eat baked foods, and rather than simply lumping them into the junk food category, why not learn how to improve them?

That said, I thought I’d share my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe made with whole wheat flour. Baking with whole wheat flour is not exactly the same as white flour and you shouldn’t have the same expectations. However, you can often substitute a percentage of white flour for wheat, without a significant difference (anywhere from 50 – 100%). Just keep in mind that this won’t work in all cases. But you should absolutely give it a try and do some experimenting.

wheat-germ

oats1

Whole wheat flour has around four times more fiber than white and contains higher amounts of potassium, magnesium and zinc. I’m not about to say that these cookies are a health food, but they are a healthier option than many alternatives. The wheat flour and oats help give these cookies a nice crispy texture that I really like. This recipe produces large thin cookies, so be sure to leave plenty of room on your baking sheets, as the recipe suggests.

chocolate-chips

Whole Wheat Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies

  • 2 3/4 cup / 9 oz rolled oats
  • 1 cup / 4.5 oz whole wheat flour
  • 2/3 cup / 1 1/2 oz wheat bran (or germ)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
  • 1 cup / 8 oz  unsalted butter
  • 1 cup / 6.5 oz natural cane sugar or light brown sugar
  • 1 cup / 6 oz firmly packed dark brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 10 oz / 285 g semi-sweet chocolate bar, chopped

Preheat the oven to 350F, with racks placed in the middle. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside. In a medium bowl combine the oats, flour, bran or germ, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.

Either by hand, or using an electric mixer, cream the butter until light and fluffy. Beat in sugar for 3+ minutes, scraping down sides a few times along the way. Incorporate the eggs one at a time, then the vanilla – scraping the sides of the bowl another time or two. Add the dry mixture, and stir until everything barely comes together. Then stir in the chocolate, mixing until it is evenly distributed throughout the dough.

Use a small ice-cream scoop or 1/4 cup measuring cup to make uniform dough balls. Arrange each cookie at least 3-inches apart on the prepared baking sheet. They’ll flatten out quite a bit. For extra crisp cookies, bake until deeply, deeply golden on the bottom, about 15+ minutes. Rotate the pans once about 2/3 the way through baking – back to front, top to bottom. Like your cookies a little chewier? Bake for less time. Cool on a rack.

Makes about 2 dozen large cookies.  Prep time: 20 min   Cook time: 15 min

Baking with Pumpkin: Whoopie Pies

One of Elizabeth’s family’s favorite things to eat during the holidays are pumpkin whoopie pies with cream cheese filling. While they might not seem like the most healthy of foods, they are certainly better than the whoopie pie options sitting on grocery store shelves – the kind chock full of unnatural preservatives. (That reminds me, did you hear that Hostess is no longer making Twinkies?)

I happened to be have the honor, or at least I thought, of judging the whoopie pie contest at the Vermont State Fair this year. More than twenty whoopie pie bites later, I regretted my involvement. However, out of the many entries, by far the best was a pumpkin whoopie pie with cream cheese filling. That’s why I’m in support of these. That, and pumpkin itself is low in fat, calories and sodium and high in vitamins, fiber, and Iron.

To make these pies you need three cups of pumpkin puree. Getting your own puree out of a pumpkin, as opposed to a can, is easy to do, I talk more about it on our Harvest Watch blog. It’s then just as easy to freeze the puree to save for other times of year, such as now.

Pumpkin Whoopie Pies with Cream Cheese Filling

For the Cream-Cheese Filling

  • 3 cups confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 1 tablespoon ground cloves
  • 2 cups firmly packed dark-brown sugar
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 3 cups pumpkin puree, chilled
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Start by making the cookies: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or a nonstick baking mat; set aside.
In a large bowl, whisk together flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves; set aside. In another large bowl, whisk together brown sugar and oil until well combined. Add pumpkin puree and whisk until combined. Add eggs and vanilla and whisk until well combined. Sprinkle flour mixture over pumpkin mixture and whisk until fully incorporated.
Using a small ice cream scoop with a release mechanism, drop heaping tablespoons of dough onto prepared baking sheets, about 1 inch apart. Transfer to oven and bake until cookies are just starting to crack on top and a toothpick inserted into the center of each cookie comes out clean, about 15 minutes. Let cool completely on pan.
Make the filling: Sift confectioner’ sugar into a medium bowl; set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter until smooth. Add cream cheese and beat until well combined. Add confectioners’ sugar and vanilla, beat just until smooth. (Filling can be made up to a day in advance. Cover and refrigerate; let stand at room temperature to soften before using.)
Assemble the whoopie pies: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Transfer filling to a disposable pastry bag and snip the end. When cookies have cooled completely, pipe a large dollop of filling on the flat side of half of the cookies. Sandwich with remaining cookies, pressing down slightly so that the filling spreads to the edge of the cookies. Transfer to prepared baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate cookies at least 30 minutes before serving and up to 3 days.

Recipe from marthastewart.com

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