Quest Spotlight: Trees of Hanover Quest

With this amazing stretch of sunny days we’ve been having, I wanted to get outside and do more Questing! This week, I went out to do the Trees of Hanover Quest. This Quest takes you around downtown Hanover and highlights the many species of trees on Dartmouth’s campus!

This Quest is also on our Super Quest that features the Top 25 Quests in celebration of the 25th anniversary of Vital Communities. Make sure to register, so that you and your team can get out and Quest. This Hanover Quest is a great way to ease into the challenge. You’ll only need to complete 5 total Quests in order to get a patch!

Your Quest starts on College St, facing the large white buildings that line the Green. Before Eleazar Wheelock founded the school, the Dartmouth green was once a forest of pine trees!

Farther on the green, you can find a large elm tree, one of few left. Many of the elm trees on campus died from Dutch Elm Disease, brought to the United States on logs from Europe. The first signs of the sickness make the leaves wilt, and then start to affect entire branches. The disease can spread slowly in older well established trees but can kill a tree in just a few weeks if the tree is young and fast growing. If you’re interested, read more!

After admiring the trees that line the entrance to Tuck Dr., the Quest takes you back through the green and past the stone chapel. Climbing up the hill and into College Park, you’ll have a good view of the observatory. The stone tower on the hill, Bartlett tower, was built to be as tall as the Lone Pine. Moving forward from the tower, you can even see the stump of the Lone Pine! As you continue up to the statue of Robert Frost, look around for your treasure and your Quest will be complete.

Whether its a walk in the woods, or a historical tour you seek, use our search tool to find your next Quest!

Valley Quest: Discover What’s Hidden in Plain Sight

Yesterday afternoon, as the sun set quietly over the western hills of the Upper Valley and the peak temperature of 60 degrees dropped to a cool 52, I grabbed my dog and headed out the door to begin my first Valley Quest.

A Valley Quest is as enchanting as it sounds. It’s a treasure hunt for people (and dogs) of all ages, and a perfect excuse to explore the amazing places that surround us.

On the Vital Communities website I found a Quest in my hometown of Lyme. The Grant Brook Trail is an easy hike that took me around 30 minutes to complete. Like all Valley Quests, this one comes with a set of directions that lead to a treasure box hidden at the end.

After following the map, reading each clue carefully, and, admittedly, taking out my compass, I found the treasure box and signed my name in the guest book inside. Although that may have been my goal, it was what I discovered along the way that made the true impression on my day.

While I was walking to the trail head I passed a group of Lyme Elementary students playing baseball, enjoying the nice day as much as I was.

Once I got to the mossy old stonewall that was the start of the Quest, I let my dog hop over it first, obviously eager for me to reach the other side so we could continue our walk.

As we walked, I let all of the sounds piece together to form one incredible picture of the natural world. Grant Brook babbling beside the trail, birds chirping and singing, leaves crunching beneath my feet, and even the occasional gust of wind reminded me that I’m just a little part of such a large and incredible world, and what an amazing thing it is that we are able to explore it.

The Grant Brook Trail may be short in distance, but it was the perfect way to get outside and get more connected to the region that surrounds me every day.

I went to Lyme Elementary, and even though Grant Brook Trail was always nearby, it never occurred to me to explore it. That’s the great thing about Valley Quest: It helps you discover the beauty and wonder hidden in plain sight right here in the Upper Valley.

Did you know there are more than 200 Quests literally all over the 69-town Upper Valley region? Find yours today!

Mariah Lang is a summer communications intern joining Vital Communities from Roanoke College in Virginia.